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Garden one month after moss killer. What to do next???


 
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michelle_conn
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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 12:30 pm    Post subject: Garden one month after moss killer. What to do next??? Reply with quote

Hi I'm a learner gardener Smile
I applied moss killer to my garden one month later and it still doesn't look great. I raked out the moss with spring tine rake, but still think there is lots in it.
I bought a small packed of Johnston quick lawn seed from aldi, which I put a bit on, but it's growing a different type of grass. My husband says he put hayseed on the garden . Any ideas how I can help bring green back to my garden?
If I scarify it with a manual one will it help?
Any help much appreciated.
Thanks M
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 3:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if it was a sulphate of iron based moss killer, i read recently (maybe here) that it's best to dress with lime - as the acidity in the sulphate of iron is what kills the moss, but that moss likes acidic conditions. what kills it in large quantities is what it likes in small quantities.
so you want to counteract that acidity.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it will green up in a couple of weeks you should scarify it with a machine then reseed the bald patches, everyone does this in spring Why because everyone does it but the best time to do it is in the Autumn when the moss is growing and you can reseed and the grass wil regrow no problem.
so do it again in Autumn.
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michelle_conn
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PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

medieval knievel wrote:
if it was a sulphate of iron based moss killer, i read recently (maybe here) that it's best to dress with lime - as the acidity in the sulphate of iron is what kills the moss, but that moss likes acidic conditions. what kills it in large quantities is what it likes in small quantities.
so you want to counteract that acidity.


Thanks I must have a look at the westland bag.
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michelle_conn
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PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
it will green up in a couple of weeks you should scarify it with a machine then reseed the bald patches, everyone does this in spring Why because everyone does it but the best time to do it is in the Autumn when the moss is growing and you can reseed and the grass wil regrow no problem.
so do it again in Autumn.


Was afraid if I used the scarifying machine I would make the garden worse. One more thing.What kind of seed is best? My husband thinks they used like farming hayseed. Would I need to dig up the clay on the patched and then seed or seed it and put some soil over the seed? Sorry I am pretty hopeless with lawns. Thanks so much for your help and good advice. M
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MartinByrne49
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PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recently came across a product called Mobacter. It contains a bacteria and fertiliser and is organic. I used on my lawn and was very impressed. No discolouration. My distribution was a bit off but I'll do it again in the autumn.
Martin

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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed May 29, 2013 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

you have to crack an egg to make a cake, i would go for a general purpose lawn mix
have a look here
http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/profile.aspx?pid=424
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michelle_conn
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PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
you have to crack an egg to make a cake, i would go for a general purpose lawn mix
have a look here
http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/profile.aspx?pid=424

Very true Smile thanks so much
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2015 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MartinByrne49 wrote:
I recently came across a product called Mobacter. It contains a bacteria and fertiliser and is organic. I used on my lawn and was very impressed. No discolouration. My distribution was a bit off but I'll do it again in the autumn.
Martin

i finally remembered i had this stuff buried behind other stuff in the shed and tried it a couple of weeks ago. does seem to have made a difference, i'm getting good grass growth and the moss seems far less prevalent.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 31, 2015 8:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That Mo bacter sounds very interesting. I've been reading some reports on it. If I can get some locally I'll try it out - there is a huge growth of moss this year and the grass is beginning to struggle. Normally I don't mind the stuff but this year it'd definitely OTT.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 4:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One piece of advice that was given to me is that trying to create a 'billiard table' lawn like the putting area on a golf course can encourage moss. Set your mower a couple of notches higher for a while.

There's a definite application time for Sulphate of Iron, i.e. Sept - March, and there's no need to buy proprietary brands at twice the price. Farmers' co-ops have the basic commodity in bags without all the razzmatazz. Scarifying after use, using a forward and back motion, will produce surprising amounts of moss and I assume that, by letting your grass then grow longer, it somehow stifles what's left of the moss that doesn't grow as fast?

As to what you do with all the moss you've taken off? It won't compost - that's why we have peat - so an early morning bonfire can be an answer.

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Greengage
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 6:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The biggest problem wiith moss is drainage, wet damp enviorments encourage it. So maybe have a look at that as well, if you could aerate it an add sand it will help
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blowin wrote:
It won't compost - that's why we have peat - so an early morning bonfire can be an answer.

i've thrown moss in the compost bin and it's composted fine; my understanding is that it's the acidic anaerobic conditions in bogs which prevents decay. in the same way that wood will decay, but not in a bog.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, really? You learn something every day. I put loads of it in my compost heap when we did a lot of 'therapy' on our lawn but it just compacted down. Mind you, I'm the type that doesn't go in for the turning of heaps so that may explain it.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 03, 2015 3:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sounds similar to the effect you get when you overload a compost heap with grass clippings?
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