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Creating small wooded area


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Clondoolusk
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 14 May 2013
Posts: 26
Location: Laois

PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2013 8:09 pm    Post subject: Creating small wooded area Reply with quote

Hi, any suggestions on what to plant for a small wooded area, we have a small area which is low lying which we will never use as lawn so the idea is to create a wooded area which someday might be nice and full looking with bluebells planted etc...it also deals with an area which would need big work and filling to raise to level of rest of site. All ideas welcome!
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john1412
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 25 Feb 2013
Posts: 48

PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2013 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

either of the two native Birches, some Black Alder and maybe some Willows, i'm assuming that your "low lying" means that it a damp or wet area? if you want on the outsides of the area if it's dry put some Beech too, or if you don't want beech on the outsides and if it's wet try some Ash trees or Mountain Ash too, and if you want some green over the winter maybe a few Scotts Pine, however these will grow very tall and might not be suited or match in with the area where your planting

Last edited by john1412 on Thu May 23, 2013 8:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2758
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2013 8:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trees , Rowan, Birch, Pine, Holly Hawthorn, fushia and Hazel
Bulbs Bluebells, Snowdrops, snowflakes
Foxgloves, Arum, wild garlic, wild carrot, Trilliums.
here is a pic ogf one i have been working on for the past three years its approx 8 metres wide by 40 metres long



woodland view.jpg
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Clondoolusk
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 14 May 2013
Posts: 26
Location: Laois

PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2013 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's excellent looking greengage exactly what we want, how old are your trees?? Our dimensions are very similar to yours. We want a nice mixture of trees we would really like some pine for the evergreen during winter but it can be prone to holding water not much but it is damp during winter months.
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john1412
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 25 Feb 2013
Posts: 48

PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2013 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
Trees , Rowan, Birch, Pine, Holly Hawthorn, fushia and Hazel
Bulbs Bluebells, Snowdrops, snowflakes
Foxgloves, Arum, wild garlic, wild carrot, Trilliums.
here is a pic ogf one i have been working on for the past three years its approx 8 metres wide by 40 metres long


Looking very well Greengage did you start from a blank site of were any of them trees there already? i'm in the process of starting my own too so i've been doing a good bit of research into it, only thing is the area where i'm planting is 122m by 55m in size so it's going to be a few years before i've much done, planning on putting in 100 Alders at the end of this year, along with some oak too
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Clondoolusk
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 14 May 2013
Posts: 26
Location: Laois

PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2013 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage, would love to see a fewore pictures if you had some to post.
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Greengage
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Joined: 09 Nov 2011
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I inherited it but it was a big big mess which you could not access, I raised the tree canopy and removed briars trash, fallen branches and a couple of sycamores and pollarded all the hazels, No one approved as it was a serious mess when I finished now everyone thinks its brillant why didnt we do this before and all want credit for my work.


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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2013 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

very nice work indeed.
i'm hoping to do similar, but with a much smaller area - probably 20 foot by 40 foot; there's a leylandii hedge to come out first. one problem i have may be soil fertility; it might simply be too fertile, it's where the previous owner let years and years of cuttings rot down.

there is one tall (40foot) birch there already, but i have more birch, hazel, rowan, holly, hawtorn and yew to go in - tallest currently about 30 inches tall.

i'll be following this thread with interest.
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Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2013 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

In a woodland leaves and branches constantly fall improving soil fertility, it is important to have some dead wood to increase biodiversity, fungi insects etc..
I think the most important thing is to have small leaved trees to allow dappled shade and light to the understory, once the soil is rotavated whatever seed is stored in the soil will germinate once it gets light, lift the canopy so it is easy to walk under and create a path to walk along I created this one by just driving a lawnmower over it, then leave it to nature
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Sive
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Joined: 18 Apr 2008
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Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2013 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is so lovely, greengage. These are the sort of photos that just put a smile on my face....definitely a feel-good moment, thank you.
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tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 15 Jan 2011
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Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2013 11:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plant your trees as it is. Forest soils should be fertile, so don't worry about tree detritus rotting down. Use tree shelters (https://www.google.ie/search?q=tree+shelters&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=8pygUfPjIYqp7AbD6YHYBw&sqi=2&ved=0CDcQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=552), as they help protect the young trees from adverse weather and bark damage from humans and animals. Plant about 2 metres apart, and then thin out the ones you don't want in 5 years. Can you add photos of your intended area?

When thinning out, look at a 3 metre square. If you have three trees, remove the largest (wolf tree), and the smallest, leaving the middle one to grow on. There is a difference with things like Hazel, which you want to coppice. Coppice stools should be at a 2m equidistant spacing. Existing hazels (and also Castanea sativa - sweet chestnut) can be layered (bend an existing branch down in winter. Damage the bark with a knife, then peg the damaged bit to the ground 2m from the stool. Cover with forest floor humus. After a year, you'll have a new plant and can cut the connecting rod). Cherries and Sloes will sucker. If you cut them, new shoots will arise from the root system, which have to be managed as they grow by a constant war of attrition in spring.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2013 11:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i had understood that if the soil was too fertile, the understorey flora would have trouble competing with the likes of nettles.

i think i read about it here:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Collins-New-Naturalist-Library-100/dp/0007202431
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tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 15 Jan 2011
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Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Sun May 26, 2013 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tree clippings, leaves and branches, don't contain much nitrogen. They are broken down by fungi and insects, which is a different process to ordinary composting. You shouldn't get too many nettles, but if you do get a large stand of nettles in one spot, don't worry! They are excellent food for butterfly larvae, humans, and make a great liquid plant food. In time, they will be replaced by other plants when they've sucked up all the nitrogen.
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Good guy
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Joined: 11 Feb 2013
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Mon May 27, 2013 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a beautiful job you have done, Greengage. Well done! I wish I had the space to do something like that. However, when the children have outgrown their play area I might manage a miniscule version......
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Greengage
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Tue May 28, 2013 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

havent time now but will post pic of micro one im working on too,
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