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Wild section of my garden


 
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Carol-Ann
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 08 Mar 2013
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Location: Ballincollig, Co. Cork

PostPosted: Sun May 12, 2013 10:15 pm    Post subject: Wild section of my garden Reply with quote

Just moved into house with quite a big new uncultivated garden. I want to leave one section for wildlife. It's relatively natural as it is but I want to know how to manage it. Anywhere I look the suggestions are to dig it all up and set wild flower seed. To me that just seems to defeat the purpose. I want to maintain the diversity that is already there not kill it and replace it with something else.
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tippben
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Joined: 15 Jan 2011
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Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 11:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

First try to identify the species present. Any wild space will try to revert to scrub, then woodland, which benefits some wildlife, but not others. You will need to manage it somehow, so it's a really good idea to know what's there before doing anything. If you have things like nettles, ivy and brambles/briars, don't eradicate them, as the are of huge importance for butterflies, bees and birds. Try to create lots of edge habitats: scrubby bits to long grass, long grass to short grass etc. This can easily be done by using a strimmer or mower to create paths through the space.

To improve the space, add some kind of water, like a pond, or scrape, a log pile, and a stack of stones. Try to site your compost heap/grass clippings here as well. I agree with you on the lack of need to reseed the area, but try to add extra wild flowers as plugs: either bought, or grown from seed, then planted out. Can you put up a picture of the area?
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Mon May 13, 2013 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would agree wait and see what you have for this year, then remove what you dont want, I would strimm it all down late summer if its meadow and leave to lie for a few weeks to allow seed to fall from plants for next growing season, maybe post a pic so we can have a look.
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tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


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Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes. If it's a meadow, with plenty of species present, it needs to be managed as a meadow. My advice was general advice. We really need to know more about what you're dealing with.
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Carol-Ann
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Joined: 08 Mar 2013
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Location: Ballincollig, Co. Cork

PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks everyone for your help. I'll take some photo and try to identify what is there. There are young gorse just appearing which I definitely don't want.
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tippben
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Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 12:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gorse is a great bee/insect plant, but as long as there is plenty near to you, yep pull them out and don't worry. If yours are the only stand in 5 miles though...
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Carol-Ann
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Location: Ballincollig, Co. Cork

PostPosted: Wed May 15, 2013 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is definitely no shortage gorse in the area. It seems to be thriving if anything; on the side of the main roads and any rough bit of ground. In fact I think there some in the garden and they were cut down to stumps before we moved in. They are going to be a job in the rest of the garden where I don't want it to be wild.
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