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Help my Scots Pine please.


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Sive
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Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 10:40 am    Post subject: Help my Scots Pine please. Reply with quote

I have two lovely young Scots pines...maybe about 15 ft tall. Both are staked since we planted them about 4 years ago and we get a lot of wind here. One seems fine, but the other regularly breaks free from supports and ties and always leans in one particular direction, as if the roots on one side aren't strong enough to anchor it.
My question is: is it worth trying stronger support systems to allow the tree to grow better roots on this weaker side, or is it too late for that now ? Have roots been damaged and are they likely/unlikely to regrow ?
Sadly, the tree looks healthy otherwise, but of course getting more top heavy as the years go by.
I am so sad about this beautiful tree that I really need some good advice about what to do. Sad
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 12:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

is it showing any sign of lifting the soil on the windward side? and i assume it's leaning with the wind?
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Sive
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 1:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes on both counts. It's a heavy tree with a good thick trunk and of course being an evergreen, creates considerable leverage with its top-heavy growth.
I would never plant that size of pine again...I would go for much smaller whips to let them settle in.
I don't mind doing my best to give it good support, but not if it's actually a waste of time, and the tree will always get toppled over.....not forgetting that as each year goes by, it becomes a much heavier tree to support.
I appreciate any advice you can give me.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i'm afraid i don't - i was asking to see if the leaning was just a natural reaction to the prevailing wind, rather than a sign of it toppling.
you'd need to strike a balance between supporting it, but not providing too much support, which would lessen the natual reaction of the tree to buttress itself. i'm sure there are people more knowledgeable than i who woul dhav suggestions.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 11:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fifteen foot is still quite a small tree, so it's not too late. Pictures, especially a close up of what is happening at ground level, would be helpful. Trees with short stakes develop better root systems than those with tall stakes. I would try using two 5' stakes, with at least 2' driven into the ground at the edge of the root ball. Then put in a cross piece, and use a rubber spacer to protect the bark. Make sure that the stem is on the windward side, so that strong wing pushes the tree against the spacer. If the ties that you have been using are breaking, try using hosepipe: it can be wrapped around the stem, cross bar, and stakes, and has "give" in it.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, Tippben,maybe that is the way to go......I was afraid I was wasting my time, thinking that maybe the tree would never be able to support itself properly.
Any ties/supports so far have been at around the 3ft level, which means there is a lot of strain on the ties as the tree gets taller. But we have the cross bar on the SW ( prevailing wind ) side of the tree......are you suggesting we should have it on the other side ? I'm never sure what people mean by "windward".
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 4:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

've always used hosepipe to stake any trees that I have and I thought I was the only one who did that ! Shocked

Also if it was very windy, I'd drive those stakes in at a 45 angle, leaning away from the tree.

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Sive
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, that would strengthen the supports, thanks kindredspirit.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 21, 2013 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I very reluctantly cut down a Scots Pine two years ago. They are one of my favourite trees, too. But it was causing problems - about 30 ft high, it cast a lot of shade on the house and the needles it shed in vast numbers were a real curse. They littered the drive, blocked gutters and drains and even got into strange places in the car! I watched from the kitchen as the branches came of it and the extra light coming in was remarkable. I'd grow one again if I had the chance, but at least 100 metres from the house!
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Sive
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 21, 2013 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Good Guy.....my Scots Pines actually are about that far from the house ! Interesting what you say though....I would think that they cast less shade than many other trees, but then I have never lived near one......but I adore the old mature ones whenever I see them, and I decided someone has to plant them now for future generations to enjoy.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2013 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Sive, they really are beautiful trees. I hope yours do well.
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 2013 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1st time to see this Thread but I'm curious to know if you had any luck with the suggestions Sive...
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Sive
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 09, 2013 9:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, both Scots Pines are still with us ! And they've survived the recent gales.....I must have a closer look to see if the weaker one is still as vulnerable. As they are so far from the house, I tend to check them from a distance and as long as I can see both of them upright, I'm happy.
Still in pyjamas here, so I'll do that later !
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 09, 2013 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

9.32 and your still in Jammies...shame on you...once I open my Eyes I'm up... had a lie-in til' 7am this Morning...

My Daughter has Pines all round her property and when the Needles fall and your getting into your Car the floor is destroyed and Hoovering is a waste of time and Electricity...they have to be plucked out with a Tweezers they become so embedded in the Mats...anyway hope your Pines survive as they do look Majestic in the distance...
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Sive
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 10, 2013 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You'd be amazed how much can be achieved around the house in my "jammies" ! A lark I'm not, but at my age I wake early unfortunately, let himself sleep on, then do all my emailing, read the papers online, feed the birds and do washing/drying/ironing....... anything that doesn't wake up my better half.
Then he makes the porridge, so we're quits !
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