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Sweeds


 
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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 11:17 pm    Post subject: Sweeds Reply with quote

Anyone had any problems sowing Sweeds at this time? All the experts seem to go for mid may, ground at the moment in excellent condition for sowing, just sowed late spud (rooster, best keeper) parsnip, carrot, onion, ground rotavates like seed bed! Any reason why not?
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 07, 2013 9:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

if the ground is right i would go for it but i would use a cloche at the moment as the weather is not settled yet. James had an article on here a while ago ill post the link below,

http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about471.html
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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Greengage
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

there are a number of reasons for sowing swedes later. To avoid bolting, to avoid the flea beetle and to ensure that growth is more likely to be continuous rather than start and stop which causes the swedes to become tough and woody. There are years when you will get away with very early sowing but soil temperatures are still a bit low. Mature swedes are hardy in low temperature, seedling swedes are delicate.
michael brenock

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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I"ll go along with that Michael, Its just so seldom in the last cuple of years to be looking at beautiful rotovated drills just crying out for seed. Last year I got some thinnings (Sweed) from a friend and planted them alongside seed I had sown, both ended up perfect. Now, according to all the experts its not recommended to transplant. Just a cuple of questions, (A) did the thinnings grow because they were sown outside? and (B) has anyone tried starting them of in a propegater, and grew them on? (Maybe I"m back to the bolting theory, Michael) Bye the way, thinnings were transplanted in June, and , seeds sown mid may. Think I"ll try a few inside, for the crack, nothing ventured, nothing gained. (What do you reckon Michael?)
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2013 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

some good questions are posed there. Firstly swedes can be transplanted but with limited success, more likely to bolt especially if transplanted in dry weather and not enough soil adheres to the roots, watering can help. If growing conditions are good at time of transplanting then they are likely to be successful. On a commercial scale they are transplanted, using deeper modules and regulating the growth so that they are held back until planted out and then fed liberally to encourage rapid growth. Try transplanting seedlings that are raised singly not in clusters and do not have them too developed (not many leaves) at transplanting time. Depth of planting is important, just the roots in the soil not the stems. It is very hard to match the stage of growth of the seedling to the growing conditions (heat , moisture and stage of growth) outside.
michael brenock

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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 10, 2013 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent info and answer Michael, Thank you, Do ye know, an old man once said to me that everyone can have excellent results every time if they just follow the instructions on the back of a packet of seeds. So, instead of me trying to be a smartass, I will curb my impetuous ways and wait for the proper time. Thanks again.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Apologies for spoting this thread late but, for next year perhaps:-

Because individual swede seeds are easy to handle, but heeding all Michael's warnings too, the most economical method I've found is to use either partitioned trays or, better still, fibre pots in which I sow single seeds.

Germination rates are high, 26-28 out of 30, and I simply plant out a uniform row of healthy seedlings without disturbing their root structures at all. This does mean that one packet of seed will probably do four gardens (unless you're a swedeaholic) but who cares.

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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2013 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Blowin, I just waited until the proper time and now have four rows of about a thousand plants, (of which I"m going to lose about a half to two thirds through thinning) Anyone got a list of seeds which will keep once you open the packet? Also, I don"t want to give suppliers any ideas about the seed content of their packets. Last year I found that a certain supplier had reduced their seed content of tomato seeds from twenty to five, and still charged the same price. So, I shopped in England online and got twenty five seeds for the same price as a packet of five seeds here. I pointed this out to my garden center and was told a week later to pick three packets of any seed free. (Do we look stupid, Or are we?) Anyway, any help on keeping seeds would be appreciated. Bye the way, the tomato seeds were both Shirley, A beauty off the vine.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2013 11:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you intend to get involved with seed saving, I've got a very comprehensive book called 'Seed to Seed' by Suzanne Ashworth - ISBN 0-9613977-7-2. It's an American book but saving seeds is the same wherever you are so, if you've got a birthday coming up, this might be a hint to drop?
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sirpsycho
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey tunnelsofhens, I noticed the same thing with tomatoes. Annoying, but I just bought online. Hopefully they will catch on to the fact that people are not stupid!

I noticed that a lot of garden centers, Woodies/Homebases etc are selling Shirley plants this year too. Great tomato.
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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 11:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Blowin, Will look it up, Sirpsycho, I know this forum is not for the rant below, but rip of Ireland is everywhere, I bought a box of breakfast cereal in Aldi and compared to a larger box of same at home, (Well known brand) Aldi box half the size-750grams, Well known brand, much larger box-500grams. same problem over a whole range of different items. Maybe im getting cranky in my old age, but it"s getting harder and harder to buy Irish on thrust. End of rant! Evil or Very Mad
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