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Reccomend an Evergreen To Break This View...


 
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Country_Life
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 03 Apr 2013
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 6:07 pm    Post subject: Reccomend an Evergreen To Break This View... Reply with quote

Hi guys,

I'm very happy I stumbled upon this forum, it seems really helpful. So my first post... Laughing I was wondering if you could have a look at the attached photo and suggest an evergreen tree that would cover the view of the corrugated cattle barn in the background. I've included the dimensions of the area to give you an idea. I suppose it would be desirable if it was fast growing to an extent but I would not want an absolute massive tree either, hopefully there is something that would mature roughly to the height in the photo. Any advice is appreciated. Cheers!



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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What about Bamboo instead of a tree?

Evergreen, fast growing, hardy and depending on variety should stop at 20 feet.

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A little garden in Co. Limerick.Some non-gardening photographs.
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Country_Life
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi kindredspirit,
Thanks for the idea, it's an old fixer-upper cottage so i don't feel the bamboo look would really tie in with the whole quaint cottage vision I'm laboring over Smile Any other ideas?
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you in a mild area of the country? e.g near the sea? Or are you in a colder area, the North or the Midlands?

If you're in a mild area, then Hoheria Sexstylosa Stardust would be ideal. If you're in a colder area, then a once in 30 years winter would see Hoheria off.

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm basically in the midlands and it would get quite cold there. Also in that photo where the fields are in the background, we get some serious winds blowing up from that direction.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it's evergreen that you want, then that leaves you with Leylandi. Fast growing and is able to take wind. The golden form is nicer than the green type as it grows more bushier and doesn't leave a space at ground level .

It will eventually grow higher than 18 feet, however.

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Greengage
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

trees Leylandii or thuja but kep them pruned when they reach the desired height,
I would plant Portugese laurel or green laurel myself as a large hedge,
Instead of screning it completly just obscure the view with A mixture of Ash (Decidious) and Pine.
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john1412
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 11:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i'd say the green Leylandii would be the best, and going with the 18 ft long you would only need about 6, and they would be well grown into each other in 6-7 years totally blocking out the cattle shed, good wind breaker too, of course you could get bigger ones to cut that time in half when you only need a few, i'm only after planting about 95 of them there a few weeks back, i have ones also that are in 8 years and they will grow taller that 18 ft however, without cutting it could grow to nearly 50ft i think
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

looks like the soil will need a it of preparation...
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 5:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

had another think of this how about Carpinus betula Fastigiata Frans fontaine
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Country_Life
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kindredspirit and everyone, thanks so much for all the helpful suggestions, at least I have some options to work with now.

@ kindredspirit
Yeah the garden is in bad nick, I'll be getting a digger in in the next few weeks to level it and will probably need to get in some top soil at some point, that will be another thread I suspect Smile
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tippben
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 08, 2013 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm with Knieval. The "soil" looks like rubble spoil from a demolished building. You will have to really explore what's beneath, and probably buy in some topsoil, and soil improver. How far down do you have to go before you hit true soil? Is it topsoil (dark brown, with a structure) or subsoil (light in colour, probably compacted, contains lots and lots of stones)? Bet it's a metre...I'd pick Lauris nobilis (bay), thrives in poor conditions, and readily pruned.
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