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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

Moving early flowering plants now


 
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Hoopsii
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 10 Oct 2012
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:30 am    Post subject: Moving early flowering plants now Reply with quote

Hi all

I have to move the following plants now but some of them are showing small buds. What can I do to minimise damage/shock to the plants? I will be moving them this week and re-planting them within a day or two.

Sambucus Nigra
Ceanothus
Viburnum Plicatum Mariesii
Spirea Goldflame
Lilac Syringa
Spirea - can't remember the name - it has long white fingers
Berberis x 2
Physocarpus diablo
Japanese Red Acer

Thank you.
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tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 15 Jan 2011
Posts: 921
Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First, try to retain all of the root system. Err on the side of caution, and dig a large rootball.

Secondly, leave the plants exposed for as little time as possible. Do one at a time. Make sure that you know where each is going, and have the planting hole prepared.

Use mycorrhizal fungi if you can, and water them in well. Never plant anything any deeper than it's original growing level.

Don't fertilize. The plants will be in shock, and need to re root. Fertilizer will only encourage growth that the plant cannot sustain. You could use a seaweed or nettle spray as a foliar feed though.
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Greengage
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Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2945
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thats sound advuce couldnt have said it better myself
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Hoopsii
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 10 Oct 2012
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for that info. Will I get mycorrhizal fungi in good garden centres? How exactly do I use it? There will be about 48 hours between when I lift them and re-plant them. I was planning on putting them in garden sacks with the soil that was around them intact as best I can. Is there anything else I should do ?
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Good guy
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Joined: 11 Feb 2013
Posts: 2572
Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It might be worth cutting the evergreen specimens back a bit so as to reduce their transpiration after being moved. Misting them in the weeks after planting would do no harm if there are drying winds, as there often are in March/April. You could protect them from the wind with fleece or similar, until they are re-rooted.
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Hoopsii
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you all for your help. Much appreciated.
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honeybunny
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
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Joined: 16 Feb 2012
Posts: 54
Location: Dublin, Ireland

PostPosted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 2:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mind if i just hop in here with a related question.

Clematis, don't they say something about planting them deeper than you would normally?

i'm asking as im planning on putting my Clematis Montana in the ground soon, its been growing in a large pot for a number of years now and could do with being planted out.
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