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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

Wrong time of year to plant a Bamboo hedge?


 
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Sneachta
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
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Joined: 22 Aug 2012
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Location: Co Dublin

PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:36 pm    Post subject: Wrong time of year to plant a Bamboo hedge? Reply with quote

The fence at the back of my garden is quite small and I'd like to plant a row of clumping bamboo (on the assumption that it wont spread into my neighbours garden so easily) to grow as a hedge. my garden is wide but quite short so I'd like the hedge to be thin but tall enough to offer privacy so bamboo seemed like a good choice.
The garden faces south west so this would be facing north east until it grows higher than the fence which is about 1.5 metres tall.

Wrong time of year to plant?, or wrong idea altogether, would another tree/bush be a better choice for hedging?

All suggestions welcome !
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello there Sneachta.
One thing I will say is that you must be sure that what you are hoping is clumping bamboo is exactly that, and not the running variety.
If you wanted to plant something that has the look of being native and will benefit the birds within your site then I would certainly consider the upright growing Cotoneaster simonsii.



Taken from my big list of hedging...

Cotoneaster simonsii spaced at 45cm (1.5 ft) creates an semi-evergreen hedge (in mild winters) 6 to 8ft tall at a rapid growth rate.
A hedge with decorative white summer flowers followed by red fruit.
Quite shade tolerant.
Will require trimming twice a year if you wish it to look neat.

This will be available for planting bare-root now from a limited bunch of nurseries.

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tippben
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As long as the ground isn't frozen, you can plant bamboos over the winter. Two things that I'd recommend.

First, dig a trench along the hedge line, line the sides with heavy duty plastic (butyl pond liner is ideal) to a depth of at least 18", and leave the edges just proud of the surface. Remember to do the ends too! That way, if runners emerge, they'll be at surface level, and will either turn skywards, or can be cut off with loppers. They can split concrete, but cannot penetrate that kind of plastic unless severely constrained. Even clump forming bamboos increase the size of the clump every year.

Second. Don't buy small plants. An established plant in a 50L pot can be split into 4 with a sharp axe, and quadruple your money spent, with little impact on establishment and cover after a year. That should save you a lot of money, and is the way that bamboo is propagated commercially. However, back to point 1: a bamboo of that size that is not repotted or divided WILL split the pot.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thirdly, I'd agree with James. I wouldn't choose any bamboo for a hedge, as their growth habit is contrary to what we want from a garden hedge. If you wanted a similar effect, without so much vigour and invasiveness, have you considered Miscanthus? Grows to about 6/7'.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 5:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you want a hedge plant Cotoneaster a mentioned, beech, Hornbeam, escellonia, Privet, Hoeysuckle (Irish people call it Box) but its not, berberis or holly all can be pruned tight and provide a good barrier.
Here is an old post by James http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about204.html
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Sneachta
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks very much for the suggestions.

I think I'm a little spoiled for choice from the sounds of things! I have a Griselinia down one side of the garden and an ivy covered fence down the other and I think I'd like a bit of colour and variety at the end.

Taking on-board some of the suggestions I'm leaning towards a mixture of plants as the colour and attractiveness to the birds especially is appealing.
I think I'll leave out the bamboo.

Could the following be trimmed to grow as one hedge together for year round interest or would they possibly look like a dogs dinner? I'll be looking to trim them to about 6"/10cm deep if possible so not sure that some of them will take such hard trimming?:-

Viburnum bodnantense 'Dawn'
Cotoneaster simonsii
Prunus Lusitanica
Pyracantha Soleil d'Or
Pyracantha Red Column
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2012 9:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First off Unless supported by a wall or fence Pyracantha will not make a good hedge as it does not have good structure for a free standing hedge therefore it will fall over in time, The Prunus lusitanica will smother the rest and will become dominant although it can be cut tight but will need constant care to make sure it will not dominate, Cotoneaster will be grand and I think that the Viburnum is better grown as a stand alone plant but that is only my opinion others may differ, remember its your hedge and you can plant what ever you like.
If I wanted to be radical I would plant cotoneaster, Escellonia, and Viburnum tinus for evergreen and Flowers early summer and late Autumn, berries for winter this would attract Bees, butterflies and Birds. but then Im not radical Iike my hedges to be all the same variety. Good luck you can plant bare rooted plants between now and Early spring and pot grown plants anytime but make sure the ground is not frozen or waterlogged.
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Sneachta
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Greengage,

Have decided on :-

Cotoneaster simonsii
Viburnum Tinus
Escallonia "Iveyii"
Escallonia macrantha
Viburnum bodnantense 'Dawn' (in the sunniest corner, already have a small one in a pot I hadn't decided on where to put)

Hopefully will add a bit of colour to the garden end ,will probably plant a flower bed in front of it , a riot of colour during spring - autumn !
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ormondsview
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 11:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bamboo as hedging has several disappointing qualities. Certainly you don't want to annoy your neighbor with its invasive roots and thuggishness. It's a job for life trying to control it and your tastes may not be what they signed up for. I've had some for four years to bring along as a wind break and to conceal the drive and parked car next door. Planted the bamboo several feet from the fence line and cut it back as mulching around mushy areas for composting. I will certainly consider a plastic down 18 or so inches to stop its spread. The upside is that the density of roots means absolutely no gorse can penetrate from the other side. Thug plants can sometimes be good guardians.
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