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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

Shrub suggestions for north face of house


 
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treascon09
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 1:45 pm    Post subject: Shrub suggestions for north face of house Reply with quote

I am almost finished painting the house and have started to set up a shrub bed along the side (picture attached). I'm wondering what I could sow as its the north face of house and doesn't get any direct sunlight. Was thinking of few birch trees and heathers but not sure if they need direct sun. Anyway all advise would be welcome.

Thanks



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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2012 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heathers like direct light and I personally wouldn't plant a tree right next to foundations.

Shrubs: Try Vibernum Tinus and Golden Escallonia. Also Drimys Winterii.
Under the windows, maybe Carex Pendula.

Other people here will come up with loads of suggestions.

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tippben
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 3:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In a similar aspect, we have: Dryopteris ferns, hostas, Sedum spectabile, Citisus, Forscythia, Viburnum opulus (at a glance out of the window) You'll have low light levels, and it'll be fairly dry, so think woodland understory plants.
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forest flame
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

euoymus of various varieties and aucuba japonica fuschia as well as those mentioned above
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forest flame
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

euonymus even
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah, yes. Aucuba Japonica and Fuschia would be very good choices.
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treascon09
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks all. Thank god for google so I can look them all up. As matter if interest do these need a deep soil as I intend on just filling bed with topsoil over the hardcore that was placed around house when building. Prob be about 6" hard core and 12" topsoil over it
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tippben
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 3:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, the deeper the soil, the better, even if you have to make a raised bed. If there's that little, maybe try a fig? They thrive on root constriction, so make a "box" out of slabs and rocks and plant into that. You might not get many figs, because of the low light, but it's still a cool plant. Bay (Laurus nobilis) would do well there, and not cause any problems. We have two, and end up using them for cooking most days, which keeps them small.
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catman
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've always found Camelias a great option on a north face wall.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2012 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Be careful about "raising" a flower bed right up against the walls of your house.....you wouldn't want to bridge the damp-proof course.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm interested Catman. I've never grown Camellias, as I just don't like them! North facing areas are often frost traps though, and I was under the assumption that frost on the developing buds makes them drop off. Have I been wrong all these years?!
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Sunflower
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 11:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

there is an amazing choice in hosta - I'm a recent convert. I've one with tall purple flowers with the tag long gone, no idea what I'm looking for but it's beautiful in the shade. but so many nice ones, you could plant bulbs under and around them with a laurel or two to define the space? and maybe a couple of small ivy plants to climb the side of the house, ones that don't climb out of control - or climbing hydrangea like the shade...
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