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My compost heap


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sgmgarden
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's great, its good to see people making good use of their compost bins and deciding to go organic.
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energise
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 4:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sgmgarden wrote:
That's great, its good to see people making good use of their compost bins and deciding to go organic.

I use organic methods as much as possible but my father has a vegetable garden and rarely uses organic methods on it despite my sincerest efforts.
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sgmgarden
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2013 1:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It can be difficult to persuade people that it is better! Maybe one day
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energise
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sgmgarden wrote:
It can be difficult to persuade people that it is better! Maybe one day

Its kinda frustrating really but such is life. Oh well, Ill have a place of my own one day so ill be able to have an organic garden that suits me.
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sgmgarden
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 09, 2013 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes and that way you can have it exactly as you want it
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energise
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I harvested my second compost bin today. I got about two and half barrowfuls from it. I used some of the compost to inoculate my two bins and get the fresh material composting as quickly as possible.
The first photo shows one of the barrowfuls that I produced. The second photo shows the flowerbed that I dug the compost into. Does anyone think that it was a good idea to dig the compost into the soil? Should I have just left the compost on the surface? Theres nothing planted in the bed at the moment but the soil is very dusty and not very fertile so I wanted the compost to release its nutrients as quick as possible.
The last photo shows the new heap that I've started in my second bin. Ive included hay, brown grass, compost from the last heap, cabbage leaves, 2 toilet rolls, green tree leaves, green sappy twigs and some general household vegetable waste.
Don't be afraid to leave any comments, suggestions or questions for me. Wink



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sgmgarden
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looking good energise Smile You have really worked hard with this compost and it has paid off!
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energise
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sgmgarden wrote:
Looking good energise Smile You have really worked hard with this compost and it has paid off!

Thanx, Ive been making use of the good weather. Very Happy We have another day or two of good weather in my end of the country again
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baabamaal
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2013 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi energise

If I can make an observation and a suggestion (from my own experience)- the observation is that compost is really a mulch and a soil conditioner rather than a fertiliser- the fertility in it is quite water soluble so I would be using it either to mulch as a top dressing, or dig it in to improve the soil structure- I say this just to make the point that the soil might need further applications of (organic!) fertiliser depending on the requirements of the plants.

My suggestion is that you increase the ratio of paper/cardboard to about half- once it is shredded/torn up it will, I think lead to even better compost. The green (veg) material is mainly nitrogen and the brown (paper, woody) material provides carbon and the two together result in a better compost.
I'm open to other suggestions on this but that is my thoughts on it. It really is satisfying to be using compost you made yourself on your garden! Very Happy
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energise
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2013 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

baabamaal wrote:
Hi energise

If I can make an observation and a suggestion (from my own experience)- the observation is that compost is really a mulch and a soil conditioner rather than a fertiliser- the fertility in it is quite water soluble so I would be using it either to mulch as a top dressing, or dig it in to improve the soil structure- I say this just to make the point that the soil might need further applications of (organic!) fertiliser depending on the requirements of the plants.

My suggestion is that you increase the ratio of paper/cardboard to about half- once it is shredded/torn up it will, I think lead to even better compost. The green (veg) material is mainly nitrogen and the brown (paper, woody) material provides carbon and the two together result in a better compost.
I'm open to other suggestions on this but that is my thoughts on it. It really is satisfying to be using compost you made yourself on your garden! Very Happy

Thanx for that, ill keep it in mind when Im next making up a batch. I already use some cardboard and paper in the compost anyway.
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energise
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right people, Its been an awful long time since I posted here. I had to harvest one of my compost bins because the bin was falling apart. The bin was never great quality to begin with anyway. Some of the partially rotted material was put into the second bin and the grass heap. I kgot well rotted compost that went onto a flower bed and part of the veggie garden. Unfortunately, Im now left with a bin thats of very little use to me. Can anyone recommend any replacement compost bins and suppliers. Capacity would need to be at least 300 liters? Im useless when it comes to DIY so making my own isnt really an option Wink Any suggestions??
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hear what you say about not making your own. I made my own about 12 years ago and still going strong and have been out in all weathers since. I made them from 6*2" treated timbers and expect to get many more years from them. If you cannot make them yourself then get someone who can, it is worth it in the end.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 21, 2015 11:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, energise. It's good to hear from you again.
If you can get a hold of some old pallets in reasonable nick they are easy to make into a compost bin. My first bins in this garden were made from five pallets, arranged like an 'm' and tied together with old electric wire and a few nails. The fronts were closed by two more pallets, also held in place by wire hooked around a couple of nails. They lasted years and cost nothing, taking less than an hour to erect.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I appreciate what you've said about a lack of DIY skills but it wouldn't be Ireland if you can't find a bit of help somewhere nearby?

I agree with the concept of pallets making excellent material, as per the last post, but getting them home can be the biggest problem unless you have a trailer or biggish jeep. One side issue is that the big blue pallets sometimes have a strong plastic board(s) at the end(s) - presumable to protect against damage - and, if enough of them can be found, they'll literally last a lifetime.

Lastly, I have to ask what is the purpose of your heap? Is it, as others have said, for nutrition or soil conditioner or both? It may be beneficial to have a scroll through the earlier Nettle Fertiliser post. Since having my five 200-litre drums (cost 25 the lot) I filled one with nettles, a second with mainly nettles and the rest with general household waste. Water was added to each as I put matter in and I covered with polythene when full. What the outcome will be I don't know, but every ounce of the contents is still there - it can't escape.

To prepare my runner bean pits I forked out all the solid(ish) residue from the nettle drums and put that in. The evil smelling liquid, or 'tea', is now being used (diluted) to give a start to cabbage plants etc as I plant them and I applied a small amount neat to some purple sprouting plants that seemed reluctant to mature. On first impressions, they seem to be responding OK.

I mention all this as the basic drums are cheap and rot proof. Whatever is put in them will provide whatever feed they contain plus rotted solid matter for conditioner. I have no idea about the science but I do have a lot of both - 1000 litres all told - that I can use throughout the coming season. I don't see how it can be harmful but ....... famous last words!

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tagwex
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2015 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those big blue pallets usually have a levy on them, 15 around here anyway, so they can be quite hard to get for nothing.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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