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Growing trees from cuttings, mountain ash, holly, alder, syc


 
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JohnGalway
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 10:43 am    Post subject: Growing trees from cuttings, mountain ash, holly, alder, syc Reply with quote

Hi folks,

I am going to grow some trees on the cheap to plant in the future as shelter belts on my farm. Species I am interested in are Mountain Ash, Ash, Holly, Alder, Sycamore, Willow, Hawthorn.

Googling for information has been a bit of a struggle. While I have got some information, a lot of results I find aren't worth the click to open the link!

I want to come at this two ways
[list=]long term grow trees from seeds/berries
short(er) term grow trees from cuttings[/list]

I do not want to buy trees/whips.

Could some knowledgeable folks point in the right direction, or outline on thread, the best times and ways to grow these trees from cuttings, and also the best times and methods of growing them from seed/berries.

Thanks in advance

ATB,

John
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You need this book Our trees a guide to growing native trees from the tree council
http://www.treecouncil.ie/publications.html
simple when you know where to look and thats the service we provide here good luck.
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JohnGalway
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2012 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the link Greengage! Wouldn't you know it, I found that very book not long after I posted last.
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phelim_d
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2012 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi there,
if you pop willow cuttings into water they form strong roots- stronger than for the same period in soil- so you get good thick roots to give a better start to the plant. take 9" or 1ft cuttings in early spring and plant 3 weeks later (once they root)

you can do this all summer long for some types of willow...
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Gautama
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
You need this book Our trees a guide to growing native trees from the tree council
http://www.treecouncil.ie/publications.html
simple when you know where to look and thats the service we provide here good luck.


Here's that book in PDF format:
http://www.treecouncil.ie/pdfs/Our%20Trees_A%20guide%20to%20growing%20Ireland's%20Native%20Trees-June%2008.pdf

Regarding Salix, here's the propagation advice:
"Willow establishes easily by wind blown seed and can also be propagated by
taking cuttings approx 8 inches long from stems between half an inch and one
and a half inches during dormancy, which are simply pushed into the soil to a
depth of 4 inches max."

I was fishing today along some inches where there has been a lot of erosion over the years. I hadn't been here in a while but a lot of anti-erosion works had been done. Large rocks along the bank. Then I noticed many sticks of willow protruding from the soil above the rocks. Diameter of 5-8 cm, protruding about 10cm.
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phelim_d
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 30, 2012 12:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guess willow are a species adapted to getting their roots in their first off the mark...

No wonder they are so widespread in all environments (including harsh ones... traces to the remnants of the last ice age? (Probably!)
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AJ
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 10:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only one I know about is the holly. If you go into some forests you will find little holly's on the floor, just dig them up and plant them. They will grow fine.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some of my most successful trees have been grown from acorns....a lot of fun and I rather love the idea that the resultant oaks could be around for centuries to come, even if I'm not ! I grow them in pots and plant them out when they're about 12 inches tall. They do amazingly well.
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djh
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If rhe grass is long where the trees are to be planted it is better to grow them a bit longer in the pots. You can pick the best trees to pick the acorns from but it might be a few hundred years before the difference is noticed.
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Axeman
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2012 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Willow should be the easiest by far. It is the ultimate species when it comes to growing cuttings. Break a willow branch off a tree and stick it in the ground and it will grow. This ability is something that might help with the other cuttigs also believe it or not
Try running a search on google for the term willow water. I'm not quite sure how its made ( probaly small branches boiled). But if you soak the other cuttings in it before planting it is suppose to dramatically increase they're ability to root.
Been a tree surgeon i wouldn't normally share advice that is probaly considered an old wifes tale. However i studied biology in college for a bit a few years back and came across ( could.nt begin to remember where) some scientific research on willow. And it seems to be legit. The chemicals in the willow that make it so adaptable and induces root growth, seems to have the same effect on other trees too
Probaly dosn't answer your question but some food for thought. Might help or might just be of interest to look up. Best of look with your cuttings and be sure to keep us updated
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