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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

Best evergreen hedge to plant ?


 
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gardenbliss
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 7:05 am    Post subject: Best evergreen hedge to plant ? Reply with quote

Hi all, looking for advice.
The hedging is required for the south and east border of a half acre site that has just very recently had a very large number of pine trees removed. There is 40 yrs of pine tree shedding on the ground and in the soil etc. The site is 8 miles from the mid west coast. Ideally the the hedge would be evergreen, moderate growing, easy enough to maintain, 1-2 trims yearly and would form a 6-8 ft boundary. There is some exisiting griselinia in other areas of the site which was badly damaged with the frosts. Existing areas of escallonia were unscathed but they were sheltered by the tall pine trees which are no longer present.
First choice would be Escallonia, or a mix of Escallonia and Eleagnus, providing some summer and autumn flowering interest.
Does anyone have any advice on what might suit best taking into account the soil conditions, location and requirements?
Thank you
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Escellonia is Commonly used as a hedging plant, it grows about 1 ft per year, and reaches between 4-8 ft in height. It is happy in coastal areas, but not very tolerant of dry winds.
Escallonia Macrantha flowers from June to October. It has masses of rosy crimson flowers, with a honey fragrance.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 8:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most shrubs don't flower properly when they are trimmed hard as a hedge. Escallonia is an example. When unfettered, the flowers are beautiful.

Have you considered a Gorse hedge? Thrives on poor, sandy or acidic soils and flowers profusely when trimmed hard.

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Greengage
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah No gorse is a weed it will pop up everywhere and very spiky to cut never in a garden sorry
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2012 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
Ah No gorse is a weed it will pop up everywhere and very spiky to cut never in a garden sorry


It's not a weed if it's in the correct place. Very Happy If you give it free rein, then it'll go for world domination as any happy in its position, self respecting plant will.

A mower gets rid of any seedlings in the grass and use garden gloves when trimming it. When trimmed very hard, it's a MASS of yellow in the Spring for a long time. You can keep it very narrow as well.

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gardenbliss
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 6:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you both for the replies. If Escallonia is suitable for the site then I think that would be the best option. Sorry kindredspirit I am not a massive fan of Gorse. For some reason it is the only flower that gives me sinusitis/allergy every spring.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 7:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry to complicate matters, gardenbliss, but you need to know that there is a fungus currently affecting escallonia which causes it to drop its leaves in the autumn. If you put in a search on this forum, you'll find a whole thread about this problem.
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gardenbliss
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Sive, Thank you for that, it does seem widespread and I am not sure I would chance a full new Escallonia hedge. Any thoughts on the other evergreen options i.e Laurel or Eleagnus, or maybe just a semi-evergreen privet ?
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can't go wrong with Laurel, although if you grow it as a hedge you won't see the little white flowers.

It's as tough as old boots and only needs trimming once or twice a year.

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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2012 4:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Go for Portugese Laurel then smalller leaves and can take a hard pruning, it is very resilient, hardy and much more ornamental and easier to maintain.
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gardenbliss
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great advice! Thank you everyone, the Portuguese laurel is currently top of the list
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The Garden Shop
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2012 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have seen Photinia 'Red Robin'planted along with Laurel and it looks good.

Both are evergreen and once the Photinia establishes its fast growing.
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