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Deciduous trees to contrast with Golden Leylandii hedge.


 
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Mayflower
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Joined: 27 Aug 2010
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2012 1:11 pm    Post subject: Deciduous trees to contrast with Golden Leylandii hedge. Reply with quote

I'd appreciate some advice please. My neighbour's house is directly across a narrow country road from mine...his is slightly lower than the road and mine is higher.

I have planted a Golden Leylandii hedge inside my wall to grow approx 5' high. Have dug out three holes between hedge and my house for trees for a little extra privacy. This is what I'm thinking - height 15-20' approx, maybe purple leafed to contrast with hedge, hopefully early leafing in spring and dropping late in autumn, if not purple leafed then with berries maybe.

This is not set in stone so any ideas or suggestions would be great! Thank you.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2012 2:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Acer, Amelanchier, Sorbus,laburnum, Corylus, Acer campestre,
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2012 4:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Liqidamber.

http://www.google.ie/search?q=liquidambar&hl=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=MdfQT760FcezhAfa4NieDA&sqi=2&ved=0CHgQsAQ&biw=1009&bih=549

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Honey Monster
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2012 9:13 pm    Post subject: Re: deciduous (sheds and renews leaves annually) trees to co Reply with quote

Mayflower wrote:
I'd appreciate some advice please. My neighbour's house is directly across a narrow country road from mine...his is slightly lower than the road and mine is higher.

I have planted a Golden Leylandii hedge inside my wall to grow approx 5' high. Have dug out three holes between hedge and my house for trees for a little extra privacy. This is what I'm thinking - height 15-20' approx, maybe purple leafed to contrast with hedge, hopefully early leafing in spring and dropping late in autumn, if not purple leafed then with berries maybe.

This is not set in stone so any ideas or suggestions would be great! Thank you.


Hi Mayflower

A lovely shaped deciduous purple tree i can think of is Fagus Sylvatica 'Purle Fountain'.Another would be Cercis Canadensis 'forest pansy' .
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Mayflower
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2012 4:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks very much for all the replies. I have checked out some of them and they look great.........will have a good browse over the weekend. Hope to visit some nurseries over next few weeks but I think deciding what is needed is the biggest job! Thanks again.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2012 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why didnt you plant a native hedgerow which would fit in with a rural landscape, and not try to stick out like a sore thumb.
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djh
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could consider replacing the leyllandii with flowering shrubs and particularly scented ones. Since you only need a 5' hedge they won't take that long to grow and would make a big improvement to the overall appearance. .
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Mayflower
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Joined: 27 Aug 2010
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Location: Co Clare

PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
Why didnt you plant a native hedgerow which would fit in with a rural landscape, and not try to stick out like a sore thumb.


Even though I joined this website some time ago I've only had the opportunity to become involved quite recently. So thank you everybody for your comments this time and hopefully in the future. However Greengage could I respectfully say that I would welcome your answers/suggestions to queries I may have ongoing but please refrain from making unhelpful judgemental comments as above.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tut tut hand slapped. point taken, If you post its open everyone is entitled to their views, doctors differ patients die. Keep posting and if we can help we will. In the good old days of the celtic tiger people paid for this advice.
I bet in 10 years time you will regret planting a golden laylandii, in the past couple of weeks ive seen mature leylandii dead because they were cut too tight in dry weather now they have the problem of removing a large hedge that gave privacy and it will take years to get it back and their privacy is gone.
aside I HATE LEYLANDII they will grow 60 feet and more and always grow out very hard to keep in check cannot be cut back hard, sucks up large amounts of water casts shade causes moss to grow on lawns does nothing for wildlike and effects breathing and causes skin rash when cutting.
thats the rant re leylandii. and finally if you live in a rural area it might be against the county development plan to plant leylandii.
http://www.doeni.gov.uk/high_hedges_2.htm
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tippben
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Joined: 15 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just my penny's worth. I'd think that any Cupressus planted as a hedge, with the intent to keep it at around 5' is a bad choice. Are you sure that they are Leylands (Castlewellan gold), and not Cupressus macrocarpa "Goldcrest" which are much less vigorous? Either variety will outgrow that situation very quickly, though the latter will take slightly longer to do so.
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