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Rain water harvesting


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Good guy
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Location: Donegal

PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2015 5:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Sue. Those are really useful photos. I'm interested in the type of pump you used, too.

Just to confirm, there is no separate reservoir, just the polythene cistern? I like the simplicity. Sometimes, I've looked at the big polythene tanks etc out at the agricultural co-op and thought they could be put to water-garden use.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2015 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

After a lot of rummaging around, I have finally tracked down the invoices for the job (really must clear out the caravan). The pump is a Lotus Otter Premier Pond Pump 2000!

I got it from aquacadabra. It cost 44.95. We got 3 of them, one for our little pond, one for the big, formal pool at my friend's and one for this little feature. It is a bit too big for this job, but we reckoned it was better to turn the flow down than not have enough power.

It doesn't get much use - only when they have visitors Rolling Eyes but ours has run 24/7 for the past 3 years (except for cleaning and when the pond was iced over) Very Happy

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ponddigger
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2015 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi sue,thanks for the imfo.on pump. I like hozelocks pumps myself. jack
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2015 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Sue. Thanks for the info. It is duly filed away for future reference.
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cravings
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hello everyone

good threads some of these.

i'm at the stage where i'm planning watering infrastructure and such. specifically i'm preparing to build the block base for the greenhouse.. and seems to make sense to put a water pipe through under the blocks... not 100% sure what sort of watering system i might come up with, but no harm in having a meter of pipe through i could connect something to later, no?

anyway.. real question here is.. has anyone run a water pipe underground? i think building regulations are 900mm under ground for mains water pipes.. i'm thining if i buried a length of blue poly pipe or similar to cross under the lawn, it would be really helpful in future to be able to rig up a tap on the far side of the grass...

this wouldn't be mains, would be fed by an ibc.. haven't figured all the details out, just at the idea stage really.

nayone done this and had problems with freezing?

cheers.
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Sue Deacon
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I did my friend's garden we ran a length of pipe from her house to the veg garden. Some of it is under the drive, about 1' down. The rest runs along the path/border edges, about 6" under the stone path - which is itself about 3" deep. It has gone through 4 winters so far with no problems, though the winters have not been THAT cold.

We ran it along path edges so it would be easy to find and hard to put a spade through!

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Building regs are really about the pipes supplying mains water to the house and taking waste water away. It is vital that these neither freeze in a hard winter nor suffer mechanical damage due to cultivation etc, hence the depth. You are unlikely to be doing much watering in a freeze-up! Sue's advice re routing her friend's pipe is good.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was just reading this through and formulating my reply and then I read GG's. For once he is spot on and virtually said what I was going to say.
If you can get 900mm depth then do it as then you should never have a problem. Personally, I have an overground 1/2" hose running overground with an 8 variation sprinkler head in the greenhouse and an irrigation system on a timer that drips water out at a rate that I can set. I don't tend to water much during the winter!!!
If you are at design stage look into incorporating a heat sump before it is too late.

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cravings
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 9:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nice one all. yeah i'm not really thinking of going 90cm down.. but maybe cut as much of a slit as i think i'll get away with in the grass, push the pipe down as far as it'll go, and just close up the slit again and presume it'll recover
do you think a greenhouse heat sump is really necessary?
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Depends what you are growing. If it is through the frosty periods then yes. Also, if you are at planning/construction stage then why not? Cover all bases.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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