Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Irish Trees & other trees grown in Ireland

staking amelanchier ballerina


 
Most Recent Posts Ploughing
Last post: tagwex
Sticky: How can we improve the Irish gardeners forum?
Last post: tagwex
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: tagwex
Veg in Modules
Last post: Good guy
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
banner
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 25 Sep 2008
Posts: 263

PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 5:18 pm    Post subject: staking amelanchier ballerina Reply with quote

What is the correct way to stake a tree and do they need them. Some people say thye don't need staking

it is an amelanchier ballerina and is about 6 foot tall in a pot. It will be in an area surropunded by a four foot fence.

What way should the stake be, straight or at an angle?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2922
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 6:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A small tree like that would not need staking, Not staking allows the tree to move in the wind this will allow the tree to butress, If you look at an established tree you will notice it is wide near the base this is the butress and helps keep the tree stable in high winds. If a tree is staked it could be prevented from moving in the wind and a butress will not form making it unstable in high winds.
If you buy a larger tree or bare rooted or move a large tree it will need staking to help it establish some anchor roots otherwise it will suffer from windrock and will always be unstable.
There are a number of ways to stake trees I would always use a short stake allowiing the tree to move in the wind but keeping it stable enough to establish anchor roots. Always check tree ties to see they are not rubbing the tree or work loose or are too tight and always remove after 3 years.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
banner
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 25 Sep 2008
Posts: 263

PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2012 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
A small tree like that would not need staking, Not staking allows the tree to move in the wind this will allow the tree to butress, If you look at an established tree you will notice it is wide near the base this is the butress and helps keep the tree stable in high winds. If a tree is staked it could be prevented from moving in the wind and a butress will not form making it unstable in high winds.
If you buy a larger tree or bare rooted or move a large tree it will need staking to help it establish some anchor roots otherwise it will suffer from windrock and will always be unstable.
There are a number of ways to stake trees I would always use a short stake allowiing the tree to move in the wind but keeping it stable enough to establish anchor roots. Always check tree ties to see they are not rubbing the tree or work loose or are too tight and always remove after 3 years.
where i bought it the horticularist told me to stake it. i forgot to ask how etc.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2922
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Sun Apr 01, 2012 7:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would not bother, its his job to sell you a tree, stake, tree tie, compost and a spade if your flush with funds. Thats how we make our money Laughing
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
banner
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 25 Sep 2008
Posts: 263

PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2012 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is still not planted. Can it be left in pot for a while and should it be fed or anything
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Anonany
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 09 May 2011
Posts: 67
Location: Bray, Co Wicklow

PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2012 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I very often buy small -- thus very cheap -- trees/shrubs, leave them in their original pots and sink them (pots and all) into the ground until I've decided quite where to put them. I've never deliberately fed them -- but then, I'm lazy ! -- but have found that they'll sit tight for at least a couple of years quite happily.

Once I've decided upon their final position, I just dig up the pot (and cut off any tap roots they might have tried to put down through the bottom of the pot) and move them to their new home. My logic is, quite simply, that all the feeding roots are concentrated around the stem and the tap roots are -- in the greater scheme of things -- unimportant until they're allowed to develop in their final position.

I rarely stake anything, but do put lots of rocks / heavy blocks on top of the root ball. So far -- fingers crossed ! -- I've not lost one yet.

Not sure whether this is "accepted gardening lore" ... but it's always worked for me. Come to think of it, I seem to remember that the late Geoff Hamilton did something similar using a timber frame construction at soil level ? Perhaps someone else remembers the exact details ?

As proof, this year we re-planted a couple of cherry trees and a crab apple that had been bought in Lidl about 3-4 year's ago ... and they're all thriving.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
banner
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 25 Sep 2008
Posts: 263

PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2012 8:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonany wrote:
I very often buy small -- thus very cheap -- trees/shrubs, leave them in their original pots and sink them (pots and all) into the ground until I've decided quite where to put them. I've never deliberately fed them -- but then, I'm lazy ! -- but have found that they'll sit tight for at least a couple of years quite happily.

Once I've decided upon their final position, I just dig up the pot (and cut off any tap roots they might have tried to put down through the bottom of the pot) and move them to their new home. My logic is, quite simply, that all the feeding roots are concentrated around the stem and the tap roots are -- in the greater scheme of things -- unimportant until they're allowed to develop in their final position.

I rarely stake anything, but do put lots of rocks / heavy blocks on top of the root ball. So far -- fingers crossed ! -- I've not lost one yet.

Not sure whether this is "accepted gardening lore" ... but it's always worked for me. Come to think of it, I seem to remember that the late Geoff Hamilton did something similar using a timber frame construction at soil level ? Perhaps someone else remembers the exact details ?

As proof, this year we re-planted a couple of cherry trees and a crab apple that had been bought in Lidl about 3-4 year's ago ... and they're all thriving.


thanks. Buti mean in the pot like in thebgarden centre not planted in pot?Might get to plant it today


Quote:
I very often buy small -- thus very cheap -- trees/shrubs, leave them in their original pots and sink them (pots and all) into the ground until I've decided quite where to put them.

That is a good idea
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
banner
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree


Joined: 25 Sep 2008
Posts: 263

PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2012 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Greengage wrote:
I would not bother, its his job to sell you a tree, stake, tree tie, compost and a spade if your flush with funds. Thats how we make our money Laughing
I planted it yesterday. it was/is very windy and i did not stake it.. Do you think it will hold OK, it is blowing a lot in the wind?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Irish Trees & other trees grown in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2017 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)