Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Organic gardening in Ireland / Alternative and Sustainable Gardening practices

Proposed Teagasc GM potato trials


 
Most Recent Posts Garlic problem
Last post: Greengage
funny
Last post: ponddigger
Introduce yoursellf to whom.......................
Last post: Keeks
I'm new here
Last post: tagwex
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
Cleo
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 09 Feb 2011
Posts: 6
Location: Mayo

PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2012 12:31 pm    Post subject: Proposed Teagasc GM potato trials Reply with quote

Hello, All

At a meeting held on Thursday 15th March, attending members of Mayo Organic Group voted unanimously to oppose the proposed GM potato trials by Teagasc. In addition to signing an on-line petition, it was decided to distribute information on the trials, as well as a letter/petition to all contacts

Sign on-line at www.gm-moratorium.com/ or contact Mayo Organic on mayo.organic.events@gmail.com

This is an issue of both national & international importance, on a day when our pride in our heritage is going to take a hammering internationally by loosing our GM-free food status.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2758
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Sat Mar 17, 2012 9:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

what if we dont agree with you
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ian
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 22 Jun 2007
Posts: 234
Location: Tallaght

PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2012 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Greengage,
you can always set up your own petition in favour of the trials,
'tis the future of farming, anyway genetic modification has been going on since agriculture began it's just that direct gene manipulation in this way will speed up the decline in diversity which we have been witnessing particularly over the last 250 years,
already many non-commercial species of plant and animal have died out and this is a worry as genetic diversity is the only thing which will help a species survive a catastrophic threat.
i knew that masters degree would come in handy one day!
regards,
ian.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2758
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Sun Mar 18, 2012 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fair play if you have been monitoring for the last 250 years, imagine if we had all this technology during the famine 167 years ago millions of lives could have been saved but sure you be happy to see everyone else suffer so long as" I'm all right jack pull up the ladder"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ian
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 22 Jun 2007
Posts: 234
Location: Tallaght

PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2012 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was that last comment directed at me?
i would'nt be happy to see anyone suffer in any way , and i don't know how you could have drawn such an inference from what i wrote.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Greengage
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2758
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Wed Mar 21, 2012 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This thread has been doing the rounds on a couple of websites encouraging people to sign the petition. Not everybody agrees that they should be banned.

In 1895 the potato blight affected the crop in Ireland resulting in many deaths and mass migration.
The leaves of the potato turned black and withered; when the potatoes were dug up they turned into a slimy rotting mess. The blight was caused by a fungus Phyptophtora infestans. To this day the disease is still prevalent. It is estimated that as much as 20% of the 120 million tonne potato crop is destroyed by it.

Traditional plant breeding does not prevent the fungus from attacking potatoes this is not because disease resistant genes are bad but due to all the other genetic makeup of the potato believed to be in the tens of thousands of genes that make up the humble spud.

To get the potato crop to market they can sometimes be sprayed up to 15 times with fungicides to prevent the spread of diseases. Fungicides are toxic chemicals some more harmful than others, even the copper fungicides used by organic farmers have their side effects being both poisonous to animals and people. Some copper resistant bacteria thrive at the expense of others and it has been said that some of these are also resistant to antibiotics.

What if scientists knew the genes in wild potatoes that are resistant to blight and they were removed and added to your favourite potatoes what a difference that would make.

Across the water in Norfolk England scientists are carrying out trials on this and in Germany they are asking the EU to approve their new blight resistant potato "Fortuna" for sale.

Scientists have been studying natural disease resistant in plants for decades to develop potato plants that can withstand the blight. (It was in Ireland that Phytophtora infastans was identified in the National Botanic gardens) If the Germans succeed Fortuna will be available in shops across Europe in 2014/15.

So are these added genes harmful, they are just bits of DNA the same as the rest of the potato and their proteins are tiny variations on the resistant proteins that are already in the potato but which are not effective against blight. But people say adding genes can have unexplained problems An EU report on Bio safety research on genetically modified organisms concludes that GM methods of crop modifications are not likely to cause problems. So are we going to get potatoes in our shops that have not been sprayed with fungicides, who knows they are after all GMOs and both Greenpeace and the soil association and many others have given GMOs bad press, there are many scary claims about the effect GMOs will have on our health and the environment I general so far how many of these have stood up to hard scientific scrutiny.

I believe using genes to protect crops and improve yield in potatoes is better than spraying with chemicals. Better for us, the land and all the other insects that we share the planet with. It is just as dangerous to be spreading rumours and half-truths when all the other scientific evidence says otherwise.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am very much in favour of a trial using GM potatoes and I will then make up my mind whether * am in favour of GM crops or not. Cross breeding or haphazard breeding is a crude method of getting a better variety.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Organic gardening in Ireland / Alternative and Sustainable Gardening practices All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)