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A medium question


 
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AJ
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 12:12 am    Post subject: A medium question Reply with quote

Want to sow some annual flower seeds in pots and tubs. The particular varieties that I want to grow are normally the one's you sow directly into the ground in spring. Want these to stay in pots over the summer so I was just wondering what medium should I use to get the seeds to germinate and flower for the summer thereafter. The plan is to fill a pot with the medium sow the seed and let it grow away all summer long, obviously fertilsing and watering as required. Should I use compost, moss peat, grit, sand or soil, or a combination of these.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 18, 2012 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fill your containers with the hanging basket type compost, mixed with the water-holding gel.
Firstly fill it with the hanging basket type compost, compost to within 3 inches of the container lip, settle this lightly by pressing down with your fingers, and then top up again to within 4 inches of the lip.
This compost will provide strong feeding for your annuals roots when they reach it.

Next, top up the container with John Innes seed compost.
Take your time and bring this to within 2-3cm (1 inch) from the lip of the container thus leaving a space for watering. This is the layer of compost which will host our seeds for the first few weeks until their roots dig much deeper seeking out the richer layer beneath.

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AJ
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You know James, that makes absolute sense. Now why didn't think of that Laughing .

Many thanks for the help Wink

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robineire
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2012 4:41 pm    Post subject: Raised Garden beds Reply with quote

I got some used scaffolding planks a month ago and have made a raised garden bed 160cm by 80cm 2 boards deep. It will take a lot of soil to fill it and for drainage I was going to put stones in the bottom. Where should I get good quality soil from? Hopefully the house sale will go through very soon and I amm going to replace windows in the house, I,m thinking of making a greenhouse out of some of the glass windows and making a wigwam type structure over the raised bed with others, has anyone done this before?
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AJ
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 26, 2012 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Best thing is to keep your eye open for a new house being built and pop in and ask for some top soil (will be probably be full of weed seed's but you can't have it every way,
wouldn't be too worried about the quality as you can alway's dig in some compost.}, you can alway's buy top soil bagged in garden centres but if you need alot it could be expensive. Good idea recycling the glass but make sure you can open for ventilation

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Anonany
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 11:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
making a greenhouse out of some of the glass windows and making a wigwam type structure over the raised bed with others, has anyone done this before?


Yes, we built a lean-to style one in our last garden, using old sash windows for both the roof and sides.

We acquired the windows and door FIRST, then built the base structure to suit, which saved a lot of fiddling trying to make things fit later.

I wanted a house that would stay reasonably warm -- without heating -- all year round, so we sank it underground by about 12 inches, put in a concrete floor and built block walls to about 12 inches above ground level. It also meant that there was a decent internal working height, plus all woodwork was well above ground level and easy to maintain.

The door (also recycled) was centred in one of the short sides and flanked by two narrow windows.

I don't remember the exact construction, but I think my Husband built a basic "house" frame on top of the block walls to which he then attached the windows.

The only specially made pieces were the apexes at each short end and the narrow windows flanking the door. I don't remember our putting in side vents, but I do remember there being a decent-sized automatic roof vent. I seem to remember that we removed the glass from one of the sashes and re-jigged things a bit.

We were lucky ... a builder gave us the frames (complete with glass) and an old, narrow frame-construction door free. All we had to buy was the timber for the basic frame and glass for the two apexes, the door and the two narrow windows flanking the door.

It worked wonderfully well and was in constant use for about 10 years before we moved to our new home, some 24 year's ago. According to an ex-neighbour, the new owners have continued to maintain it and it's still going strong !

If you don't mind a bit of forward-planning and some DIY, then go for it !
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AJ
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That sounds like recycling at it's best, another thing I came up wth recently was a rhubarb forcing pot. Had this old wheelie bin stuck around the back of the garage for the past couple of years and my wife had asked me on several occasions to get rid of it, but my answer alway's was ' that will come in handy someday' Very Happy .
So last year I put in a rhubarb plant and was thinking of buying a forcing pot. Then it dawned on me if I cut the wheelie bin in half, used the top half as a forcing pot, the lid makes it handy for checking it, and the bottom half will be used for growing carrots or spuds in the greenhouse towards the end of the year. Very Happy

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Anonany
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 3:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello AJ ... I think we gardeners have always been way ahead of the recycling field ! Like yourself, I've all sorts of bits and bobs squirreled away in corners ... "just in case".

Love your DIY rhubarb forcing pot and having an inbuilt "inspection" lid just puts the icing on the cake. Fingers crossed for a tender crop !
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AJ
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2012 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonany wrote:
Hello AJ ... I think we gardeners have always been way ahead of the recycling field ! Like yourself, I've all sorts of bits and bobs squirreled away in corners ... "just in case".

Love your DIY rhubarb forcing pot and having an inbuilt "inspection" lid just puts the icing on the cake. Fingers crossed for a tender crop !


Love your description of my forcing pot, really makes it sound, hi teck, hi spec Very Happy . Have had a peep in on a couple of occassions and there is some really bright red stems coming up. Hopefully will be able to make some rhubarb crumble like my old gran used to make Rolling Eyes

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