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Beech Tree cut back


 
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poggo
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 6:49 pm    Post subject: Beech Tree cut back Reply with quote

Hello all i am a newbie here and have a question, I hope this topic has not been coverd before, I have read Jame's post about the laws covering the felling of trees and i understand that. I am lucky enough to have aquired a Cottage in rural Kildare with half acre whose boundries are coverd with mature trees all beautiful as they have not been touched for many years. My problem is that on one side near the house are 3 trees 2 Beechs and one chestnut, the diameter of the Beechs is 7 foot and the chestnut is 8 foot they are over 80 foot tall, the chestnut I have no problem with cutting back as i have done this before, but I have been told that cutting back Beech this size can have dire conquenses. So this is my question, when is the best time to do this??is the cutting the same as for other trees???
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tippben
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi, if your beeches have a 7' diameter, not circumference, they are veteran trees, at the upper age spectrum for a beech. They should not be touched by anybody except a real expert; I'd recommend Tree Care Ireland, based in Carlow, who could arrange for an inspection, and put you in contact with a proper arboriculturalist. If you mess around, they may well die, become unstable, or succumb to a serious infection.

Definitely check for Ganoderma fungus, and also http://www.aie.org.uk/fungi_base/ustulina/aie_fungi_ustulina.html. at the base of the trees. These are very serious diseases of old beeches, and if they are near a house or road, they will need to be removed unfortunately.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 10:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, link appears not to work. The other fungus is Kretzschmaria deusta, which used to be called Urstulina deusta.
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poggo
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

opps!!!! silly mistake I meant circumference, sorry about that and thank you for your replies, even though the info was incorrect i can only apologise(blush)
there is no fungus at the base of these trees eccept what you would expect on a healthy tree..again apologies.... Embarassed

Poggo
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tippben
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A healthy tree will only have "symbiotic" fungi, ie, those interacting with its roots, and any fruiting bodies would appear far from the trunk. Especially with beech, if there are any signs of bracket fungi, or other fungi growing from the trunk, or in the root buttresses, you really do need to get it checked out!
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poggo
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 1:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tippben wrote:
A healthy tree will only have "symbiotic" fungi, ie, those interacting with its roots, and any fruiting bodies would appear far from the trunk. Especially with beech, if there are any signs of bracket fungi, or other fungi growing from the trunk, or in the root buttresses, you really do need to get it checked out!


Thank you tippben, yes there was a bracket fungus growing from the root buttress, I tried to load a pic but i was not able to do so,it is brown in colour, with a sponge like underside????
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tippben
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Solid brown hard top, with a white underside? Check the underside again. If your fingernail leaves a brown stripe, it is Ganoderma, or "Artist's fungus". This causes a brown cubicle rot inside the tree, and will prove fatal. The tree will become dangerous, and there is no cure. If it near enough to buildings or roads that when it falls it will cause damage, it must be removed. Sorry.
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poggo
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tippben wrote:
Solid brown hard top, with a white underside? Check the underside again. If your fingernail leaves a brown stripe, it is Ganoderma, or "Artist's fungus". This causes a brown cubicle rot inside the tree, and will prove fatal. The tree will become dangerous, and there is no cure. If it near enough to buildings or roads that when it falls it will cause damage, it must be removed. Sorry.


That is devestating news, this is such a beautiful tree, on closer inspection i have noticed that a huge limb just above the buttress was cut at some point all this area is rotten and it is at this juncture where the fruiting bodies are showing, sorry tip the actual "mushrooms" have dried, and i cannot load a pic, but from what you describe this is indeed the culprit, needless to say i am gutted, again thank you,,

Poggo
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poggo
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 5:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

one further question can i protect the tree next to this one which shows no signs of this fungus????

Poggo
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Anonany
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2011 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it's any help -- and I'm not an expert -- about 15 yrs back we had to have a venerable old beech removed.

We were advised by the arborist that -- since fungus was the problem -- it would probably be unwise to plant another beech in the same spot. In respect of a couple of younger (but still quite substantial) beeches within 20 feet or so, he suggested we just play a "wait and see game".

The original beech was replaced by a lime tree and -- so far -- the two younger beeches are still happy and healthy.

It broke my heart to lose that wonderful and majestic tree ... but it did leave lots and lots of seedlings around its base ... which is some small consolation and a promise for the future !

Good luck with your trees.
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poggo
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonany wrote:
If it's any help -- and I'm not an expert -- about 15 yrs back we had to have a venerable old beech removed.

We were advised by the arborist that -- since fungus was the problem -- it would probably be unwise to plant another beech in the same spot. In respect of a couple of younger (but still quite substantial) beeches within 20 feet or so, he suggested we just play a "wait and see game".

The original beech was replaced by a lime tree and -- so far -- the two younger beeches are still happy and healthy.

It broke my heart to lose that wonderful and majestic tree ... but it did leave lots and lots of seedlings around its base ... which is some small consolation and a promise for the future !

Good luck with your trees.


Thank you for your reply,,I have had some good advice and hopefully there will be a good outcome, indeed the beech beside the one that is infested is big and healthy, so if i am careful and take the advice i have been given, I am sure all will be well despite losing such a "Majestic" and beautiful tree..

Poggo
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