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Anemone hupehensis "September Charm" Japanese anemone


 
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2006 11:04 pm    Post subject: Anemone hupehensis "September Charm" Japanese anemone Reply with quote

This is Anemone hupehensis "September Charm" commonly known as the Japanese anemone or Japanese wind flower.


Photo / pic / image of Anemone hupehensis "September Charm", the Japanese wind flower.
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Anemone hupehensis "September Charm" facts and information.

Despite its common name this plant is in fact a native of China.
This fully frost hardy perennial grows to approx 0.6 metres (2ft) in height; with a spread of approx 0.6 metres (2ft).
For a long period starting now this plant will sport large light pink single flowers above clumpy dark green foliage.
For the Japanese anemone to shine give it a position in full to partial sun and in a soil which drains well.
One complaint that some people have levelled at the Japanese anemone is that it is invasive and keeps spreading due to the roots forming stems as they spread.
If this is a concern with you then I suggest regular division or the drastic solution of planting the anemone into a large pot buried in the soil thus halting its invasion.
I heartily recommend this perennial for "late in the year" colour, and should you require a white variety why not try planting Anemone X Hybrida "Honorine Jobert".

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Ranunculales
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Anemone
Species: Anemone hupehensis
Binomial name
Anemone hupehensis
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Cherrysparkle
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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi James,

I've seen this plant recommended on my search to find something pretty to grow on on a very shady patch beneath a tree (also known as the place where plants go to die), but in other places (like here) I'm advised that it needs at least partial sun. I know there's probably other less flowery things I could try growing, but I really want something with good ground cover and a bit of colour and this plant seemed ideal. The patch does get some light (about an hour or two in the evening), do you think I should try it or would it be (another...) waste of time/ money?

Thanks Smile
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have it and Prince heinrich and it comes up everywhere even in lawn. but it does not like being transplanted.
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Cherrysparkle
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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ha, it won't be transplanted - if it grows it's staying put! Thanks Greengage, I was tempted to try some cheapies from Lidl but I'll just buy this and see how it goes!
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2013 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cherrysparkle, I will reply by quoting an article I wrote a while back on light conditions

Quote:

Part Shade, Partial Shade or Dappled Shade.
If you see this printed on a plants list of needs, you should allow it only 3 to 6 hours of direct sunlight a day. Bear in mind that noontime sun can be far too intense for these plants; they often thrive best if they receive only morning to noon sun or else the less severe evening sun.

Dappled shade occurs when strong lengthy sunlight makes its way partially through the branches and leaves of a sheltering or overhanging tree. Examples of plants coping with partial sun include primrose, Berginia, comfrey, busy lizzies, foxglove, and Hydrangea. Of the vegetables coping with partial Shade, examples would be leafy specimens such as lettuce and spinach.

Full Shade or Deep Shade.
Anything listed as requiring this aspect can cope with less than 3 hours of sunlight daily. Plants that fall into this category are very useful, as I'm sure like me, you will have those dark, dingy areas of your garden where most sun-loving plants struggle towards failure. Examples of plants coping with deep shade include Lily of the valley, many Euonymus, Skimmia, Vinca, Fatsia, and most plain green ivies.


Taken from the article...... How many hours of light are Full sun, Part shade, Full Shade

The Anemone may grow slowly for you, but I doubt it will flower well.......... and the flower is the reason you are interested in it.

As mentioned Lily of the valley, many Euonymus, Skimmia, Vinca, Fatsia, and most plain green ivies would be more suitable for your listed conditions.
Please be aware that the shade beneath trees is usually dry shade as the tree sucks up so much moisture from the root infested soil.
You may have to import some humus rich soil to create a slightly raised bed beneath the tree to give new plants a fighting chance.......... that and regular watering in their first year.

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Cherrysparkle
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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

James thanks for the list of plants that will work well for under the tree, I'm going to try vinca (minor) as it's so pretty. I'll let you know how I get on, thanks again Very Happy
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Sive
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PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2013 7:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I used vinca in an identical position and was amazed at how well it did....and it flowered well too.
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