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Why did my cherries shrivel up and fall off!


 
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KernowWarrior
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 21 Aug 2011
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Location: Roscommon, Ireland

PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 7:49 pm    Post subject: Why did my cherries shrivel up and fall off! Reply with quote

I have a couple of young cherry trees, planted about 3 years ago, I had the same problem last year: Both trees had loads of blooms, which turned into 'fruit 'buds' (for the want of a better word) then they shriveled up and fell off. As I said the same thing happened last year. The difference is that this year, took a bit of advice, fed them with pot ash and made sure they were watered very well, but made no difference, they still shriveled up.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

you do not state whether the cherries are sweet or sour types. No sweet type will set fruit on its own. If you have three trees then presumably one is a pollinator, but the pollinator must be compatible and flower at the same time to9 be successful. Sour or acid cherries will set fruit on their own pollen. You must ascertain whether pollination took place or not. Frost drought ,pests or disease could have caused the pollinated fruit to drop. If shoot growth is good and leaves are healthy then there may be underlying problems such as Potash deficiency or a trace or minor element deficiency or an imbalance.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

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KernowWarrior
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The variety is 'Stella' a self polinating variety. Both trees were in bloom at the same time. I fed them both with pot ash and they were kept well waterered, especially during the very dry spring that we had.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

best thread title yet on this site!
though i may not have read it in the spirit it was intended.
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Lius
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm with Knievel on this one,

I was holding back on a reply because I got a rollicking for picking on Stephen Gibson absolute classic in June titled "Red Bulge......bla...bla"

All I'm going to say is that your buds may be a bit old to blossom which could explain the "shriveling" you are experiencing.


Regards
ALL SHRIVELED-UP
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 11:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

as this is a forum I think all contributions should be considered. If we accept that the trees are self pollinating then there is some factor preventing the development of the fruit. Is the tree exposed to cold winds, thereby reducing or preventing pollinating insects but unlikely to have total failure. Trace element deficiency which may show up in leaves may cause it. Do leaves show veinal or interveinal chlorosis (yellowing)? Do leaves have any peculiar shape twisting or turning or curling. I dont know of any disease that takes the total emerging fruit as described. Is extension(new) growth.good 10-12 inches long or isit short and stunted? How is drainage and soil depth? What else grows nearby crops including weeds? Are the trees growing in too much shade but good shelter?
We must try and solve this problem. In my experience problems with cherries are the hardest to solve as there is less known about them.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired).

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KernowWarrior
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Growth excellent, leaves healthy fleshy and green. They are staked and planted in full sun, garden surrounded by mature trees so sheltered from winds. The ground around them is grass, although I keep the immediate area (1-2ft or so) around base of trees clear and weeded. The ground is well drained and can dry out when prolonged dry spell, although this year I watered every night during dry days.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

only point that I could pick up there was the shelter. The trees may be too high and causing shade. Most sites get full sun in mid summer no matter how high the trees may be but how much sun do they get in April and May when the sun does not rise as high. If this is the case then the temperature is lower by day and consequently lower at night maybe leading to frost. However this would be unlikely to lead to total loss of cherries. Is there plenty bee activity there during blossom time as the presence of miniature cherries might not indicate successful pollination or fertilisation.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

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KernowWarrior
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The surrounding trees are a good distance from the cherry trees so they are never really in the shade, and there is loads of bees, butterflies etc. I have an old barn in the garden which is full of House Martins, which tend to reduce the number of flying insects in the summer, but they don't usually arrive untill late spring the cherries had already shrivelled by then.
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