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Cutting Back Tree


 
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Bloggo
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 3:35 pm    Post subject: Cutting Back Tree Reply with quote

Hi, I have this tree in my garden and I would like to identify it.
I need to cut it back a bit before it goes outside the boundaries of my property
and I would appreciate some advice.

Thanks in advance



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walltoall
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Location: Thurrock RM15 via Dungarvan and the Banner County

PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 4:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beautiful photographs may I say and a very beautiful tree. it looks like a member of the cherry family but with a 'weeping' gene. I will try to identify it properly for you later as it would be a great pity to butcher such a splendid plant. Might I suggest that, in December, you carefully remove whole branches, the ones which would want to migrate to the neighbours, rather than lop off ends. I can give you very detailed advice on reducing branches if you'd like to take that route, and I seriously believe you should. Every tree has its own specialised method of pruning or lopping and the way to deal with this baby is different to most. If you get it right you will preserve a real asset.
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Last edited by walltoall on Sat Aug 13, 2011 8:41 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good Advice!

It's a cherry all right and a really beautiful specimen. It can be a bit tricky particularly because you are dealing with such a distinct growth form. The last posts advice is pretty good and would be a good route to follow.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="walltoall"] I can give you very detailed advice on reducing branches is you'd like to take that route, and I seriously believe you should.[/quote]

Thanks for that. I just bought the house and I am told the tree is about 10 years old. It has been cut back before. I am happy to hear I have a few months
before tackling it. Any advice would be really appreciated.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 6:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A beautiful weeping cherry tree.

Are the neighbours complaining?

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2011 7:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="kindredspirit"]A beautiful weeping cherry tree.

Are the neighbours complaining?[/quote]

No the neighbours are not affected. It is a corner site and the tree is coming
quite close to going over my wall/hedge and over the public footpath.

I will probably be able to see it a bit better when it loses its leaves later on this year.
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 9:25 am    Post subject: Cutting Back Tree Reply with quote

Bloggo
Your tree is featured in "The Tree and Shrub Expert", one of a brilliant series of gardening books by one Dr.D.G.Hessayon. Most gardeners have at least a few of these lying around. They were printed and re-printed through the 80s and 90s.

Check under "Prunus" where you will find a picture of yours in full flower. I must say your photograph is much nicer and more informative. It you can't be arsed, it is indeed an Ornamental Cherry and most probably Japanese Chrysanthemum flowered. If it is, you are in for a spectular autumn leaf display leading up to the treatment I pmd. BTW, having located it in my book, I went off surfing the net as people now do. There is no way you could find your tree there. It is mis-described on many sites. However Suttons seeds have a beautiful specimen picture, showing it as it should be.
WallToAll

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2011 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes Thanks walltoal. I will indeed check the book out. I have seen it in the Garden Centre and Woodies etc.,

I have just bought the house so I have never seen the tree in bloom.
Also I am a complete novice to gardening so I really value your advice.

As you suggested I will wait till November and take some shots of it then before doing anything.

Thanks again.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2011 3:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is probably Cheal's weeping cherry. If you cut it in the winter, you risk infection from silver leaf disease. The normal time to prune a cherry is July. I'd do any pruning now, or wait until next summer.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2011 2:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is an article I found which seems to agree with an August pruning:

http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about219.html

This guy however seems to be doing it after it has shed all it's leaves (suggesting a winter pruning):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GDdid0KbhPQ

On closer inspection of the tree it seems that most of the branches have been
cut before. Certainly the branches that are encroaching on the boundaries of the site have been cut. Am I right in thinking that these will not grow any further? If so I can leave it as it is.

Here are some images of some of the cut branches.



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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2011 3:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The end of the cut branch can't grow anymore but the side shoots that'll come out will.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 15, 2011 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks kindredspirit

It seems I can leave this for at least a year then which will give me time
to see it through a full years cycle.

Appreciate all the advice everyone.
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2011 11:36 pm    Post subject: The misfortunate tree has already been butchered Reply with quote

Just so we are clear, this is adapted from a selection of articles found on the web. It relates ONLY to one particular tree. The links supplied by Bloggo in one case apply only to European Prunus and in the other applies to a fruiting cherry in USA. Our specimen is NOT suitable for pruning but since we now find it has already been butchered by the PREVIOUS owner, that's gone out the window as advice.

Prunus Kiku Shidare Zakura, known in the West as Cheal's, is one of the smallest forms of flowering cherry available. Its Japanese name means "weeping chrysanthemum cherry" and the soft pink blossoms, with their double rows of slightly pointed petals, do indeed resemble some varieties of chrysanthemum. They come out around Easter, while the young leaves are still small and richly coloured, so that all you can see from a distance is a low dome of flowers that trail right down to the ground.

In autumn, the leaves turn into a warm muddle of purple-red and orange. Kiku Shidare Zakura is ideal for the centre-piece of a lawn and looks superb near a pond. Children love playing under the canopy when it is in flower. Take a blanket outside on a nice spring day, spread it underneath your tree, lie down and gaze at the sky through a roof of cherry blossom.

While soil pH is not really an issue for your cherry trees, they do need a really rich, well drained soil if they are going to flower well for you. As for sunlight - Cheal's will survive in a shady spot but the blooms will be disappointing.

As a general rule this tree should never be pruned. The only pruning you need carry out will be to shorten lowest branches so they don't trail on the ground. At its full height, Kiku Shidare Zakura reaches 12' or just under 4m.

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