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New Laurel Hedge


 
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matjay
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 12:20 pm    Post subject: New Laurel Hedge Reply with quote

HI

My name is Jason, I am new to this forum and would like to introduce myself to you all.

Now, recently I had a Laurel hedge planted in my front garden. Some areas of the hedge are doing quite well. However there are some areas of the hedge that is not doing so well !! One example is that on some of the plants several leaves are turning yellow and dying off and the tips of the new leaves sprouting are crispy brown.

Now I'm no green fingers so I wish to know if I am doing anything wrong. I have been watering the plants once every 2 days, using a standard watering can. I wonder am I over/under watering them ?? I have also heard that there is a thing called transfer shock (would this be what is happening ??)

How often should I be watering or am I even watering them enough. I am afraid to water too much, because I have read that the roots can get soggy and they don't like that. I have also mixed in some peat moss around the base to retain moisture, is this OK to do.

One more question, what would be the ideal fertilizer to use on the hedge, I have been told to use tomato feed to which I have twice but have ceased that now as I am also afraid that this might also be harming the hedge.

Any help for you guys would be great :O)

(Hedge has been in ground for last 2 months and plants range from 2 - 3 feet and arrived in pots)
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Sive
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did you prepare the ground well before planting ? I once had to lift a laurel hedge because it wasn't thriving, and realised the ground was very compacted and the roots had nowhere to go. Once I improved the ground, it flourished.
Check the soil and see if it actually needs all the watering you are giving it.
By the way, laurel leaves naturally turn yellow and fall, but earlier in the year, I think, when new growth is starting.
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matjay
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had a person in to plant it for me, a trench was dug out for all plants and compost added when planting. The soil in itself was pretty bad. I was told it would take sometime to establish, but what is happening is quite the norm due to transfer. I will just have to keep an eye on it for the next few weeks.

I was also told to give it a good watering once a week instead of once every 2 days and feed it once a month.

Just need to know that I am doing everything correctly as I spend a couple of hundred € on this and don't want them going belly up on me.

It is growing well in places at the top, but some places are lagging behind. I'm probably just being impatient as I planted to screen the front of the house (privacy)

Thanks for the info, I will test a section to see if indeed the roots are being obstructed.
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gardenman
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Laurels are pretty hardy plants and its no wonder that there are so many of them in Ireland, however, they have one vice!!
Wet and heavy soil - apart form weedkiller, it is pretty much the only thing that will kill them in a garden. Yellowing leaves are very typical of this.
If the soil is a heavy clay soil retaining a lot of moisture, they could do very badly.
Where they are struggling is the soil slightly more wet, retaining water?
IN this situation the best thing to do is replant, add in good quality soil and provide drainage, otherwise a different hedge might be needed. Don't worry though you might get away with doing this in only the worst areas.
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matjay
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just an update on this, I dug a hole beside one of the plants that was not doing so well and the roots were quite dry !!!!!!!! This is telling me that the soil is not retaining moisture ??? am I correct in thinking so. I turned the soil on each length of hedging and mixed in so more moss peat and than gave it a good watering. I watered until it started to pool, it than soaked in nicely. I am now watering with a hose (finally purchased one) I just need to know how much water should I use, I have read on other sites that an establishing hedge needs copious amounts of water. I don't want to kill my poor hedge I want it to flourish!!!!!!!! All of your comments are appreciated,

Thanks Very Happy
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matjay
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2011 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
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matjay
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2011 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry i mistakenly sent a load of A's Very Happy
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2011 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I just need to know how much water should I use, I have read on other sites that an establishing hedge needs copious amounts of water.

Thanks Very Happy



Not a hard and fast rule (due to differing soil types), but here is a guide........

During a prolonged spell without rain (week or more) you should water gently but deeply once a week. As a rough rule of thumb apply approx 15-20 litres per metre squared of soil area. Carry out this watering in the morning and try to avoid splashing the leaves, watering the soil instead.

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matjay
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 08, 2011 2:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks James, I will keep this in mind now when I am watering, I now have a rule to work too Very Happy
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The Garden Shop
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

matjay wrote:
Just an update on this, I dug a hole beside one of the plants that was not doing so well and the roots were quite dry !!!!!!!! This is telling me that the soil is not retaining moisture ??? am I correct in thinking so. I turned the soil on each length of hedging and mixed in so more moss peat and than gave it a good watering. I watered until it started to pool, it than soaked in nicely. I am now watering with a hose (finally purchased one) I just need to know how much water should I use, I have read on other sites that an establishing hedge needs copious amounts of water. I don't want to kill my poor hedge I want it to flourish!!!!!!!! All of your comments are appreciated,

Thanks Very Happy

Hi matjay,
I feel your pain. The purchase of a hose was a good idea, But a seep hose is a real lifesaver especially when trying to establish a new hedge. my seep hose is one of the most well used tools in my collection, seriously useful.I connect mine to a water butt and position it as different areas need water.To help your hedge along give it a top dress with manure anytime from now on into winter. good luck.

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matjay
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 12:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I might just look into one of them, thanks for the input Very Happy Very Happy
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 12, 2011 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

to day I saw a perfectly good Escallonia macrantha (i think) growing in isolation in a car park, no disease on leaves and in flower. Is this an isolated specimen or a naturally occurring resistant strain. I will be keeping an eye on it as it may be valuable for cuttings. Anybody noticed any good Escallonias in their arreas?
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2011 3:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

michael brenock wrote:
to day I saw a perfectly good Escallonia macrantha (i think) growing in isolation in a car park, no disease on leaves and in flower. Is this an isolated specimen or a naturally occurring resistant strain. I will be keeping an eye on it as it may be valuable for cuttings. Anybody noticed any good Escallonias in their arreas?
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)


All my escallonia are perfect and flowering madly.

Do you want cuttings?

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