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Potato yield


 
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Yorky
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 9:11 am    Post subject: Potato yield Reply with quote

I have just finished harvesting Orla first earlies.

They were sown on 5th April (not chitted), 25cm spacing in an Autumn-manured raised bed. They were only watered a couple of times as the soil didn't dry out and were fed with comfrey liquid feed once. The total yield from 30 seed potatoes was 19.1kg.

According to RHS trials - http://apps.rhs.org.uk/planttrials/TrialReports/Potato%20early%202007.pdf - the average yield would have produced 23.25 kg so I suppose the yield was reasonable.

Would anyone like to comment on the above?
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Gautama
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You've harvested all 30 plants? If they're earlies, how are the going to keep?

I've been harvesting my Sharpes Express as I need but they've been lasting only about a week when kept in a paper bag in a dark cupboard.
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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would think thats a very good result Yorky, Don"t forget, in trials, they get optimum treatment. Have to say though, I"m just happy to turn over a stalk and see ahealthy clatter of spuds for the Dindins.
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ian
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hello Yorky,
in my opinion you may have planted the tubers too closely, personally i always plant mine approx 2ft. apart in the row and 2ft. between rows. The test you refer to by the RHS state a 45cm spacing was used. I have read it is possible to produce a tonne from a few tubers planted 5 feet apart in all directions on a piece of ground 25ft. square. I get a great result from my planting every year but fertilise heavily the previous winter. The thinking behind this spacing relates to the ethylene produced by the growing tubers, telling each other there are spuds in the vicinity so no need to grow like crazy, i like a good size spud so i space the tubers further than recomended, although i have never tried them 5 ft. apart.
regards, Ian.
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Lius
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2011 8:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very interesting,

l planted Orla as my 2nd earlies in my new 'Square Foot' raised beds, i.e. the seed potatoes are planted 1ft x 1ft apart in a soiless mix, no chemicals, just home made compost, manure, peat and vermiculite. I got a similar yield to Yorkie, however, the variation in size seemed to be wider than in previous years in standard ground planting but I just cut the monster spuds to the same size as the smaller ones and they taste so gooooooooood nobody notices..

I also wonder how you are going to store all those new spuds, I lift mine as needed for din-din's. That is very easy to do with 4ft x 8ft raised beds with paths between unlike the old fashioned mud bath to wade through.
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Blowin
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can't say I've bothered to weigh my early crop but I've been very pleased with the yield. The problem is we prefer the more waxy spud so I chose 'Kestrel' for earlies and, not only have they produced a goodly number of tubers, a fair proportion of them have been gi-bloody-normous - one spud for a meal for the two of us.

Method of planting was to draw out a shallowish drill, fill with dung, ram the seed spud into it and earth up as they grew. I planted two rows and heaped lawn mowings all round them once I'd earthed up as much as I could but whether that helped or not I haven't a clue.

I'm just keeping my fingers crossed that the 'Desiree' main crop do as well.

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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

lifted some spuds last night, happy with the yield, but as ever, there are little holes in a lot of them, and some (a small majority) are probably for the bin from being too badly eaten.

how can i avoid this next year? is it slugs eating those small holes (about 2 or 3mm across, probaby two or three times that in depth).
Also, i've seen what look like tiny white insects in some of the holes, so there will be a lot of judicious cutting out before we use them...
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The Garden Shop
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

medieval knievel wrote:
lifted some spuds last night, happy with the yield, but as ever, there are little holes in a lot of them, and some (a small majority) are probably for the bin from being too badly eaten.

how can i avoid this next year? is it slugs eating those small holes (about 2 or 3mm across, probaby two or three times that in depth).
Also, i've seen what look like tiny white insects in some of the holes, so there will be a lot of judicious cutting out before we use them...


Hi medieavl k,
The symptoms you describe could possibly be slugs, but by the dimensions of the holes it sounds like wireworm. This little pest is usually found in virgin soil (is this the case with your plot?). Keep your eye out for a little orange/yellow coloured wormlike insect, its the culprit i'd say. It may take a while to be rid of them as they dont seem to like ground after it has been cultivated for a couple of seasons.
let me know how you get on.

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Dr. Sunny Thomson
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 6:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had wire worm in my potatoes last time and I found these tips http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about1277.html showed good results so far this year.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hmm. i didn't see anything which looked like wireworm when digging them up; and i usually turn the soil over every year.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 19, 2011 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

potatoes like other vegetables will give the same yield per unit area planted but the size of the tubers is influenced largely by spacing as well as nutrition moisture pest and disease and length of crowing season. Plant potato tubers 2 ft apart for good size, earlies closer 15-18 inches.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the potato foliage is looking a bit straggly; is it OK to chop the foliage back to the ground and leave the spuds in the ground for a couple of weeks before lifting them?
i'd say it's not too long before the foliage will start dying off of its own accord.
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