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Attack of the Ash


 
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Ruby
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 07 Jun 2010
Posts: 34
Location: Kerry

PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2011 9:14 pm    Post subject: Attack of the Ash Reply with quote

Our back garden is covered in young Ash trees - it's hard to pull them out and some have in. I've noticed that the entire length of road is home to these buggers so are we condemned to an Ash forrest?

Is there a way of telling which tree is female?
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michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Tue Jul 26, 2011 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the ash tree is monoecious having both sexes on one plant. There must be a very productive tree or trees near you. The weathermust be fine at flowering time for pollination to take place. Many people would be glad of those seedlings to transplant in the Autumn.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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Ruby
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 07 Jun 2010
Posts: 34
Location: Kerry

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Michael,

So it's an unfortunate combination of weather and productive trees? Our flower beds are destroyed by the seedlings so I've been turned off this tree. Hopefully, it was just freak conditions last year...
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tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 15 Jan 2011
Posts: 896
Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 12:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only real solution is vigilance, I'm afraid. Try to remove as many ash "keys" as you can over the autumn and winter, before they germinate. In the spring, pull up the little seedlings before they get a chance to root deeply. I have a similar problem with sycamore!
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Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about a bit of guerilla gardening, Ruby ? Pop them into local hedges and ditches, or offer the seedlings to friends who have space for one or two. They're beautiful trees and make good firewood too.
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kindredspirit
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Joined: 10 Nov 2008
Posts: 2026
Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally I think Ash are weeds and if I see any seedlings I pull them up and stomp on them. Evil or Very Mad
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medieval knievel
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 03 Sep 2007
Posts: 1008

PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

well, weeds depending on where the seeds land. they're a fine tree.
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Geranimus
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 09 May 2007
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2011 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why not turn this problem into an asset? They are indeed valuable trees. Pulling them is no good, you need a spade. Dig them out and plant them in a dedicated spot. Keep them for two years and sell them on as hardy slips. Those growing for the hurley making are always replenishing their plantations. Nurseries might also buy some if they have a good shape.
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Greengage
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Joined: 09 Nov 2011
Posts: 2747
Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2011 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A challange, grow them on if you like bet you wont be able to give them away never mind sell them, If your over 40 forget about the hurleys you wont see them.
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