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Bluestone/Blight


 
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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2011 8:42 pm    Post subject: Bluestone/Blight Reply with quote

I have read the article of Klaus Leitenberger, thanks to "Gardening Daddy" -Blight 15 June, Interesting about copper residue left in soil Most people I know rotate the ground for crops so shurely 2to3 sprays with agap of 3to4 years per site can"t be that bad. Can someone please tell me what the Proper measurements are re bluestone/soda to ltrs of water. Does the water need to be hot when mixing or cold. All the local experts that visit my garden give me a different mix. Thanks to coming across this forum, I am confident I shall find out. thank you.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 1:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

An "organic" blight spray known as Burgundy mixture.
This is not a totally organic spray, but is a deemed acceptable by most organic growers.

Burgundy mixture is created by mixing......
50 grammes of copper sulphate (bluestone)
60 grammes of sodium carbonate (washing soda) or sodium bicarbonate (baking soda)
All in five litres of water.
Warm water is preferable for dissolving the ingredients.

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walltoall
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 2:31 pm    Post subject: Bordeaux and Burgundy without wine. Reply with quote

Started by condensing a load of comments (from all over the site) about blight and bluestone etc, as per below.
AND
An "organic" blight spray, known as Burgundy mixture, not organic, but deemed acceptable by most organic growers.. created by mixing .. 50 g of copper sulphate (bluestone) 60 grammes of sodium carbonate (washing soda) or sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) all in 5L of water. Warm water is preferable for dissolving the ingredients.
AND
Some blight susceptible potatoes to avoid are..... Maris Piper , Arran Comet, Arran Pilot, Desiree, Epicure, Foremost, Golden Wonder, 'Home Guard', Kerr's Pink, Majestic, Sharpe's Express, Ulster Chieftain. One hope in the search for blight free potatoes has been the introduction of the Hungarian Sarpo varieties, "Mira" and "Axona". Promising four times more blight resistance than any variety already available, I have heard great reports about these maincrops including boasts of high yields and a floury texture.
AND
You can also use copper sulphate and lime, which is called Bordeaux mixture. I would certainly use it in preference to Dithane, which is a very nasty chemical. I might be wrong, but I think it's been banned in several EU countries due to the [alleged] build up of copper in the soil due to repeated use over a 5 year period.
AND
"I didn't know you could use baking soda - we live and learn!"
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
That was to provide a context and the last comment really ignited the spark.

I did some primary research outside the internet, using things I found in my attic called BOOKS. Most especially, my 1911 set of "The Standard Cyclopedia of Modern Agriculture" 100 years old and still working well, cobbled together a distillation about the BACKGROUND to spraying for blight.

HISTORY, GEOGRAPHY, CHEMISTRY OF BLIGHT CONTROL

It has been known since at least 1750 that copper is toxic to fungal growth. This knowledge led to potato blight control measures being developed during the famine years and mildew control on grapevines. The Royal Navy clad wooden boats bound for tropical climes in copper, below the water line, so as to preserve the hulls from insects and fungus, from 1760 on. Grapes are subject to fungus attack and so, in the great wine producing vineyards of Burgundy and Bordeaux, fungicides based on copper were developed in forms suitable for agriculture.

Chemists developed solutions which could be mist-sprayed onto plants, so that a thin film of copper adheres to leaf and bark surfaces. This prevents, inhibits and kills all sorts of fungus. Vineyards are usually fighting mildew on grapes. Farmers fight blight on potatoes and tomatoes. Orchardmen use copper as a winter spray to inhibit cankers on apples and leaf curl on plums. The usual form of copper used is a sulphate, because it is conveniently manufactured by dissolving metallic copper in sulphuric acid. The resultant salt conveniently dissolves in water. However, such copper solutions are acidic in effect and would burn the foliage. So! An 'alkaline' such as lime or soda is used to neutralise it.

Any acid is capable of being neutralised by any alkaline and the chemistry is fascinating if that is what turns you on. However, you need to know what you are doing because explosions, acid burns and other unpleasant things are entirely possible. Bordeaux and Burgundy mixes make it easy by combining safe types of alkalines with suitable forms of Copper. You buy it by the bag and all you got to do is Do What You Are Told.

No matter how finely it is prepared 'bluestone' is a solid, albeit almost microscopically fine. it 'suspends' in water as mud does, rather than dissolves as sugar does. Leaving it overnight allows the solids to sink to the bottom of your container. Leaving the solution for weeks causes it to settle like mud or the sediment that made the rocks back then. THAT is why you are told to use it all up and not store bits away. It's not about it eating through the can and boring a hole through the garage floor.

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tunnelsofhens10
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BOYS O BOYS OBOYS, WHAT can I say, Brilliant, WALLTOWAL, You are the Man! WOW! and WOW! again, Bring the book out Please! What can I say, Thank you! (Encyclopedic is the word ) Please forgive me if I don"t search the Net for answers myself as my browser is so slow I have to shave between pages. Thanks to all who answered.
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