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staking laburnum


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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 7:15 pm    Post subject: staking laburnum Reply with quote

This is a laburnum I planted last year. It has flowered already. i just wondered if all the branches should be staked and pulled towards the centre or left to grow as they are. As it is hard to see them in the pic have added arrows. Find it hard to get pic under 1MB and show all and branches, they are not very thick anyway

If so what would be best to stake it with. ?



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tippben
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's tiny, don't worry! You need to kill the grass for about a foot from the stem in all directions. Use glyphosate, or light suppression. If you try to dig, you'll harm the roots. Also, take the label off before it damages the bark. It looks like its lost the leader. I'd leave it to develop naturally into several main stems, like an apple tree. If you really want to, train the strongest top branch in line with the stem, using a cane and soft ties. If you do, trim the side branches back by about 1/3 when the tree goes dormant in the autumn.
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tippben wrote:
It's tiny, don't worry! You need to kill the grass for about a foot from the stem in all directions. Use glyphosate, or light suppression. If you try to dig, you'll harm the roots. Also, take the label off before it damages the bark. It looks like its lost the leader. I'd leave it to develop naturally into several main stems, like an apple tree. If you really want to, train the strongest top branch in line with the stem, using a cane and soft ties. If you do, trim the side branches back by about 1/3 when the tree goes dormant in the autumn.
it is tiny that is why i thought maybe should be pulled together. i wanted to put decorative stone around it and wanted to skim the grass. Surely that will not damage the roots? What about a layer of compost?
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the seeds of laburnum contained in a pod like peas are poisonous. That is why the tree is normally grown as a standard ( long stem) so that the pods and seeds are out of the reach of children. it is a member of the Legume (Pea) family.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2011 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

michael brenock wrote:
the seeds of laburnum contained in a pod like peas are poisonous. That is why the tree is normally grown as a standard ( long stem) so that the pods and seeds are out of the reach of children. it is a member of the Legume (Pea) family.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
I know they are poisonous no children have access. Do you think it should be staked?
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tippben
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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2011 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's no need to stake a tree that small. A stake is only useful to prevent rootball movement, and your tree doesn't have enough "sail" for that to be a problem. If you want to train it vertically for cosmetic purposes, you can use garden canes and soft ties, creating as many main stems as you wish. Alternatively, if you leave it, it will find its own way over the next couple of years, and crossing stems, central shoots etc can be pruned out.

You do need to sort the grass out though. To a sapling, grass is just a vigorous weed. If you cut it, it'll only grow faster, robbing more water and nutrients from your tree. Personally, I'd use a glyphosate weedkiller, then an 1 foot circle of thick cardboard around the tree, then put your stone on. It'll appreciate several gallons of water in dry spells, then a few days before the next lot. This will encourage better root development as the roots chase the water. Hope this is of some help.
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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2011 9:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tippben wrote:
There's no need to stake a tree that small. A stake is only useful to prevent rootball movement, and your tree doesn't have enough "sail" for that to be a problem. If you want to train it vertically for cosmetic purposes, you can use garden canes and soft ties, creating as many main stems as you wish. Alternatively, if you leave it, it will find its own way over the next couple of years, and crossing stems, central shoots etc can be pruned out.

You do need to sort the grass out though. To a sapling, grass is just a vigorous weed. If you cut it, it'll only grow faster, robbing more water and nutrients from your tree. Personally, I'd use a glyphosate weedkiller, then an 1 foot circle of thick cardboard around the tree, then put your stone on. It'll appreciate several gallons of water in dry spells, then a few days before the next lot. This will encourage better root development as the roots chase the water. Hope this is of some help.
Thanks. will glyphosate weedkiller harm the tree? what about fertilser or compost?
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tippben
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PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2011 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glyphosate only affects the foliage it comes into contact with. I use a small hand sprayer from the local pound shop - it's very precise, as you can get very close to the target plant with no drift. When it hits the soil, it breaks down, so doesn't harm the roots. There's no need to use a fertiliser, but liquid seaweed feed once a week (M***crop) will help. This helps the roots and the soil organisms, but is not really a fertiliser. M****legrow and similar products will just cause a big flush of sappy shoots. You want a strong root system, and the roots have to work hard searching out water and food for that. You can also spray seaweed or nettle solution as a foliar feed first thing in the morning, but get another little spray gun. I have different coloured ones so I don't accidentally apply the residue of an unwanted product.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 4:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To kill the grass around the basse of the tree without harming the tree, use a selective herbicide that will only kill grasses and not broadleaves. Perfectly safe to use. Aramo or fusilade max will work. Will take 6 weeks for grass death but at least you wont damage your tree by using roundup.
Also don't use roundup near a tree with green bark such as laburnum. The stem will absorb it rapidly and die as quick as the grass.
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2012 4:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

gardenman wrote:
To kill the grass around the basse of the tree without harming the tree, use a selective herbicide that will only kill grasses and not broadleaves. Perfectly safe to use. Aramo or fusilade max will work. Will take 6 weeks for grass death but at least you wont damage your tree by using roundup.
Also don't use roundup near a tree with green bark such as laburnum. The stem will absorb it rapidly and die as quick as the grass.
Fusilade is 90 euro a litre! Is there anything cheaper that will not harm the tree
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 18, 2012 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tippben wrote:
Glyphosate only affects the foliage it comes into contact with. I use a small hand sprayer from the local pound shop - it's very precise, as you can get very close to the target plant with no drift. When it hits the soil, it breaks down, so doesn't harm the roots. There's no need to use a fertiliser, but liquid seaweed feed once a week (M***crop) will help. This helps the roots and the soil organisms, but is not really a fertiliser. M****legrow and similar products will just cause a big flush of sappy shoots. You want a strong root system, and the roots have to work hard searching out water and food for that. You can also spray seaweed or nettle solution as a foliar feed first thing in the morning, but get another little spray gun. I have different coloured ones so I don't accidentally apply the residue of an unwanted product.


I do not believe Maxi crop is good and MiracleGrow bad. Where is your evidence Miracle Grow will not help the roots.?
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 5:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

banner wrote:
tippben wrote:
Glyphosate only affects the foliage it comes into contact with. I use a small hand sprayer from the local pound shop - it's very precise, as you can get very close to the target plant with no drift. When it hits the soil, it breaks down, so doesn't harm the roots. There's no need to use a fertiliser, but liquid seaweed feed once a week (M***crop) will help. This helps the roots and the soil organisms, but is not really a fertiliser. M****legrow and similar products will just cause a big flush of sappy shoots. You want a strong root system, and the roots have to work hard searching out water and food for that. You can also spray seaweed or nettle solution as a foliar feed first thing in the morning, but get another little spray gun. I have different coloured ones so I don't accidentally apply the residue of an unwanted product.


I do not believe Maxi crop is good and MiracleGrow bad. Where is your evidence Miracle Grow will not help the roots.?


I would go by Tippben's advice.

Read his post about roots again.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kindredspirit wrote:
banner wrote:
tippben wrote:
Glyphosate only affects the foliage it comes into contact with. I use a small hand sprayer from the local pound shop - it's very precise, as you can get very close to the target plant with no drift. When it hits the soil, it breaks down, so doesn't harm the roots. There's no need to use a fertiliser, but liquid seaweed feed once a week (M***crop) will help. This helps the roots and the soil organisms, but is not really a fertiliser. M****legrow and similar products will just cause a big flush of sappy shoots. You want a strong root system, and the roots have to work hard searching out water and food for that. You can also spray seaweed or nettle solution as a foliar feed first thing in the morning, but get another little spray gun. I have different coloured ones so I don't accidentally apply the residue of an unwanted product.


I do not believe Maxi crop is good and MiracleGrow bad. Where is your evidence Miracle Grow will not help the roots.?


I would go by Tippben's advice.

Read his post about roots again.
i do not believe that. if that were true they could not sell Miracle Grow. where is the evidence?If true supply evidence. What is the diference between the product Tippben touts and Miracle Grow. According to http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about832.html Phosporus helps root development

Maxicrop has NPK 5-2-5
Miracle Grow has NPK 24-3.5-13.3

Explain the claim that Miracle Grow does not help roots and only produces sappy shoots. If it is true where is the evidence and reasoning?

Please note I have no commercial interest in either
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 12:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about not feeding the chemical industry (Valagro and Scotts) with any of your hard earned money and just put some cardboard or paper and mulch around the tree!

If you use well rotted garden compost this will act as a gentle fertiliser and keep the grass from being a problem. Clear the grass a few inches from the tree and try not to let the compost touch the bark if possible.

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 19, 2012 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

banner wrote:
kindredspirit wrote:
banner wrote:
tippben wrote:
Glyphosate only affects the foliage it comes into contact with. I use a small hand sprayer from the local pound shop - it's very precise, as you can get very close to the target plant with no drift. When it hits the soil, it breaks down, so doesn't harm the roots. There's no need to use a fertiliser, but liquid seaweed feed once a week (M***crop) will help. This helps the roots and the soil organisms, but is not really a fertiliser. M****legrow and similar products will just cause a big flush of sappy shoots. You want a strong root system, and the roots have to work hard searching out water and food for that. You can also spray seaweed or nettle solution as a foliar feed first thing in the morning, but get another little spray gun. I have different coloured ones so I don't accidentally apply the residue of an unwanted product.


I do not believe Maxi crop is good and MiracleGrow bad. Where is your evidence Miracle Grow will not help the roots.?


I would go by Tippben's advice.

Read his post about roots again.
i do not believe that. if that were true they could not sell Miracle Grow. where is the evidence?If true supply evidence. What is the diference between the product Tippben touts and Miracle Grow. According to http://www.gardenplansireland.com/forum/about832.html Phosporus helps root development

Maxicrop has NPK 5-2-5
Miracle Grow has NPK 24-3.5-13.3

Explain the claim that Miracle Grow does not help roots and only produces sappy shoots. If it is true where is the evidence and reasoning?

Please note I have no commercial interest in either


I think Ben has explained it QUITE clearly.

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