Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Garden planning, prep and landscape design in Ireland

Planting Scheme for Large Sloped Bank ?


 
Most Recent Posts funny
Last post: Sue Deacon
Skimmia seed wanted
Last post: Brendankearns
At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: Ado 2
2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Greengage
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
globetrails
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 11 Feb 2011
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 9:06 am    Post subject: Planting Scheme for Large Sloped Bank ? Reply with quote

Hello,

I have a relatively large sloped bank behind our house (25m x 4m) and am trying to decide on the plant selection for the area. As the bank is close to the house (6 mts) and is in an elevated main view from large windows in kitchen, I want to soften it's impact while giving a feeling of movement to reduce it's impact. My current thoughts are to use a large quantity of grasses (possibly Stipa) combined with another few main 'base' plants that will form the structure, and then possible add in some perenials to add to the 'flowing' effect, possibly Goldsturm, Red Edge Hebe and Russian sage?

As I've a limited budget, I want to make sure the plant's chosen do a few main jobs,

1) are hardy enough to survive an exposed slope (west facing)
2) provide year round interest
3) look well together

As I have limited knowledge of putting together planting scheme's, would very much welcome any advise from more experienced gardener's out there on the types of plant's that may suit our bank.

globetrails
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2011 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I love low-growing helianthemum numullarium, as it can weave its way through everything and is glorious when flowering. I have a lovely rusty red one....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Protein
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 05 May 2009
Posts: 240
Location: Clare

PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2011 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some suggestions:

Cotoneaster horizontalis - low growing shrub
Juniperus horizontalis 'Blue Chip' - low growing shrub
Pachysandra terminalis (Japanese spurge) - ground cover
Arenaria montana - clump forming alpine
Saxifrages - as above

_________________
"But no one puts flowers
On a flower's grave" - T Waits
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sedum and Sage
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 21 May 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Skryne

PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2011 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Grasses would be lovely, some nice hardy perennials you could use include epimediums, which spread slowly, have attractive foliage year round and require no maintenance, also geum rivale, which is semi evergreen, and has apricot/rose flowers for most of the summer. Geranium maccrorhizum is a great ground cover plant, though it can be a bit too vigorous if it's happy. Nepeta (catmint) is good, though if it isn't cut back after flowering it can look messy. I could go on, but you probably have enough choices to be getting on with by now!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
easyram
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 26 Oct 2010
Posts: 51
Location: Limerick, Castletroy

PostPosted: Tue May 24, 2011 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe a couple of Silver birches and red Dogwood (Cornus alba 'Sibirica') all for winter colour, Berberis is also good for slopes (any species and variety - pick the right size and shape for you), Cotoneaster dammeri or horizontalis or Lonicera nitida at the beginning of the slope to soften the edge. You could add a few large rocks and plant conifers around - Juniperus (again lots of shapes and sizes), small species of Pinus (like pumilo). Just add some height and different shapes so it doesn't look flat and boring. And don't use too many different species - think about a theme, pick leading colours. You can always create a medium flower bed on top with perennials etc to add seasonal colour.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Garden planning, prep and landscape design in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)