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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

hedging help


 
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lillydee
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Joined: 10 May 2011
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PostPosted: Wed May 11, 2011 5:44 pm    Post subject: hedging help Reply with quote

Hi guys, I'm a hedging/gardening novice and am interested in planting a hedge at the front of our property. It would be a good distance from the house. The purpose of the hedge would be for screening and also more importantly to attract wildlife. I want to encourage as many bees, butterflies and birds into the garden as possible and am also interested in conservation. The hedge would be aprox. 25m. I have some plant suggestions below I would love to hear any opinions on them, positive and negative. Would it be possible to add all of these suggestions into the 'hedge' or would it look strange? I thought it might be interesting to add a few tall trees to create interest/ height difference. (e.g. Wild Service/Chequer Tree and the oak). But would they create too much of a shadow over the rest of the plants?

- PYRACANTHA Saphyr Red
- Blackthorn Prunus Spinosa
- ESCALLONIA Donard Radiance
- PYRACANTHA coccinea Red
- Common Whitebeam Sorbus Aria
- Alder Buckthorn Rhamnus Frangula
- PRUNUS spinosa
- ILEX aquifolium
- Common Dogwood Cornus Sanguinea
- Common Privet Ligustrum Vulgare
- Goat Willow Salix Caprea
- Wild Service or Chequer Tree Sorbus Torminalis
- COTONEASTER dammeri Coral
- HEBE Great
- FAGUS sylvatica
- Sessile Oak Quercus Petraea


Thanks! Smile
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Greengage
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Joined: 09 Nov 2011
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Would it be possible to add all of these suggestions into the 'hedge' or would it look strange?

No and Yes (Very)
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Sive
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Joined: 18 Apr 2008
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Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd leave out the escallonia as it is badly affected by a fungus these days.
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
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Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Fri Nov 25, 2011 5:44 pm    Post subject: Re: hedging help Reply with quote

Input into some of your choices....

PYRACANTHA Saphyr Red (tends to succumb to disease if frequently puned, especially if the cuts are not clean)

Blackthorn Prunus Spinosa (Ideal for your purpose)

ESCALLONIA Donard Radiance (leafspot as mentioned, also prone to frost damage)

PYRACANTHA coccinea Red (same as mentioned previous)

Common Whitebeam Sorbus Aria (good for your purpose, however will try to grow as a tree heightwise rather than a hedging shrub)

Alder Buckthorn Rhamnus Frangula (Ideal for your purpose)

PRUNUS spinosa (Ideal for your purpose)

ILEX aquifolium (Ideal for your purpose)

Common Dogwood Cornus Sanguinea (Ideal for your purpose)

Common Privet Ligustrum Vulgare (Ideal for your purpose)

Goat Willow Salix Caprea (Ideal for your purpose)

Wild Service or Chequer Tree Sorbus Torminalis ( I'd go for viburnum opulus instead, easier manage and source)

COTONEASTER dammeri Coral (Too short, try cotoneaster simonsii instead)

HEBE Great (avoid like the plague, prone to frost damage and will get leggy in a hedge situation)

FAGUS sylvatica (Ideal for your purpose)

Sessile Oak Quercus Petraea ( I'd put these in as a cluster of trees on the property, as you lose their fine shape within a hedge).

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tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 15 Jan 2011
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 4:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with James, Viburnum opulus would be a great addition. I'd also consider Rowan (Sorbus aucuparia), Crab apples (Malus sylvestris) and Field Maple (Acer campestre) as trees within the hedge. With these, plus the blackthorn, you will have nearly continuous flower through spring for insects, fruit for birds and beasties (and you, if you're so inclined), and the gorgeous yellow of field maple in the autumn. Remember though, that whether you intend to clip the hedge, or "lay" it, if a native plant is growing strongly, you can deliberately leave it alone to become a tree.
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Greengage
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having had another look Id stick to a 60/40 mix.
If you a living in a rural area id plant whitethorn quicks mixed with so Viburnum opulus and some rowan id also put a Eunomyus europeus into the mix one only, At the end plant some hazel as this can be used later for laying the hedge and dont cut it to allow for strong rods to grow. Blackthorn would be nice in spring but has a tendancy to sucker so it may travel if not kept in check,
Pyracantha will not stand up without support, Willow roots will search for water and not fussy where it goes even into streams or your drains which will be a problem, Hebe definatly no, Cotoneaster no, Oak will become a monster in years to come but not your problem as you wont live to see it. Source you plants from native stock as some nurseries are bringing in stock from the continent which has different DNA to irish stock, Check out irish hedgelaying web site for info and contact county council for Hedgerow survey of your area.
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tippben
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Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do Irish county councils do hedge surveys? I'd volunteer for that :) what do they do with the information collected?

They don't even cut the grass on the land they own where we live; we're expected to do it at our own expense. So we're "Occupy the grass". Loads of mixed bulbs planted, a Liquidambar styracflua, a damson, and next week we're moving our blackcurrants out there for everyone to enjoy.
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Greengage
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Joined: 09 Nov 2011
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 5:35 pm    Post subject: Hedgerow surveys Reply with quote

Yes there is a plan (Somewhere) to cover a representative area in every county and a number of them are done, I have copies from Sligo, Laoise, Mayo, Kildare and Longford. Most can be downloaded fre of charge as a pdf on the internet and if you contact the heritage officer in the county you want they are very good at replying.Also check out IHLA website, There is also a very good book available on Amazon Hedges for farm and Garden by JL Beddall quiet old probably 1960 but still relevant today. Oh you cant volunteer to do it you must have a qualification but im sure the surveyors would let you help.
Liquidambar styracflua lovely autumn colour but not native so it would stick out like a sore thumb in a rural setting.
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