Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

Why not a Horse Chestnut hedge?


 
Most Recent Posts At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: kindredspirit
Ancient human remains found of the first politician
Last post: marlin vs
Who's growing what ???
Last post: Sneachta
Gardening Books
Last post: tagwex
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
dermodyr
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 27 Apr 2011
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 7:45 am    Post subject: Why not a Horse Chestnut hedge? Reply with quote

Ok so I had a really bad hedge growing down the side of my back garden. Well it wasnt really a hedge but a mount of clay with briars, dead elms and lots of ivy.
I cleared it all out and Im just throwing in all sorts of saplings and seeds I found around the place. e.g. Horse Chestnut conkers, Ash, Sycamore and Elder saplings.

Anyway to get to the point. I noticed how full the Horse Chestnut saplings are and was just wondering why dont people use these as a cheap hedge? I know its supposed to be an actual tree but isnt a beech also? It leafs earlier than the beech and could imagine it being very full and beautiful if it was managed properly.


Last edited by dermodyr on Thu May 05, 2011 2:00 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you think about all the plants and trees that are used as hedging, they tend to have small/smallish leaves. If you think of the size and form of horse-chestnut leaves, they would look rather messy as a hedge, and very difficult to trim as well.
And someone more qualified than I am may well be able to explain more about the tree itself....maybe it would never grow the way beech does......
After all, oak leaves are neat, but I've never herd of an oak hedge.......there must be good practical reasons for all of these traditions !
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
medieval knievel
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 03 Sep 2007
Posts: 1010

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

beech destined for sale as hedging also have their roots pruned to promote bushy growth - which i presume you have not done.
also, another reason beech is popular is that it retains its leaves in the winter if cut to a hedge; i don't know if horse chestnut does this.
sycamore is too fast growing to be practical, i assume?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dermodyr
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 27 Apr 2011
Posts: 13

PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I havent actually put in a Horse Chestnut hedge, just a couple of conkers (now 4 inch saplings) in a ditch. I was more wondering why not have a Horse Chestnut hedge.

It does lose its leaves during the winter and like the sycamore it was be fast growing. Its funny though, I actually googled it and not 1 return for a Horse Chestnot hedge.

There must be more pertinent answers as to why nobody tries it. Just wondering what they might be.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 07, 2011 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi dermodyr, I have to eat my words. I said in an earlier post that I had never heard of an oak hedge....well, I was watching a programme on BBC2 last night where Monty Don is visiting Italian gardens and I was amazed to hear him describe a very tall hedge as being an oak hedge ! Now exactly which type of oak it was he didn't say.
You learn something new every day.......
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
medieval knievel
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 03 Sep 2007
Posts: 1010

PostPosted: Sat May 07, 2011 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

holm oak maybe? given it's evergreen, it might be a more popular choice for a hedge.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 07, 2011 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a definite possibility...hadn't thought of holm oak. Ordinary oak would be a strange choice as it would be bare in the winter. Monty Don just said "oak".
Anyway, one way or another I had never heard of such a hedge before.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Garlicbreath
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 28 Oct 2007
Posts: 181
Location: Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 07, 2011 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't see why horse chestnut couldn't be used in a big naturalistic hedge but it would be a pain to trim into a tidier shape! Does it coppice well? I don't think I've ever seen a multi-stemmed horse chestnut!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sive
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 18 Apr 2008
Posts: 1731
Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Sat May 07, 2011 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I still think it's the leaves that are too large and unattractive for hedging purposes......and they go very ragged and and rusty as the summer ends......I always think chestnuts look a mess by the end of the summer.
I just don't think it would be worth growing a chestnut hedge for the pleasure of the greenery for maybe only 5 months of the year.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 15 Jan 2011
Posts: 921
Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Sun May 08, 2011 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You could use horse chestnut as a laid hedge. It wouldn't work as a clipped formal hedge. I think the reason it isn't used is that the plant tends to have a naturally spreading habit rather than the vertical growth needed for a hedge.
I have seen sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) used as a laid hedge in southern England. I'd go for beech or hornbeam if you want to clip it, or a mixed native hedge if you want to lay it. Laid hedges can be lightly trimmed in winter to keep in check between layings.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Sun May 08, 2011 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

you could make a hedge out of any tree except that each year the wood gets thicker and stronger and eventually the tree gets out of the hedge. Beech is more suitable as its shoots are more twig like and easier to manage. There are plenty shrubs that are suitable for training as hedges.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

_________________
michael brenock
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gardenman
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 04 Aug 2011
Posts: 33

PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 10:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael's right most trees could make a suitable hedge if pruned properly, Beech after all is the king of the woods in Ireland and is the perfect hedge.
The main reason, beech works so well and horse chestnut isn't even the leaf size but rather the inter-nodal spacing i.e. the amount of space on the stem in between one leaf and the next.
In Beech it might only be an a couple of cm. In Oak it might be 6-7cm. IN horse chestnut there is often up to a foot of space from one leaf to the next, particularly when they are fast growing in the April/May. I'm afraid it would be all timber and no leaf after a while.
It also relates to branch development, might be only a few cm between beech branches but again a few feet between chestnut branches. Would have plenty of room for views at least.

_________________
gardenman77@gmail.com
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Gardening-Cured/121518484610150
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2017 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)