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Wasps and Bees "Eating" something in my something


 
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eggplant1
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Location: Kerry, Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2011 8:10 pm    Post subject: Wasps and Bees "Eating" something in my something Reply with quote

Hi everyone. Firstly i am not sure what the shrub is. Snowball something.... Its about 12 to 14 feet in height. This evening I noticed that about 20% of the leaves are distorted and buckled and rolled up. Wasps and bumble bees seem to be attracted to the damaged leaves and were trying to get inside the rolled up bits (ignored blossom & healthy leaves). I picked a leaf and unrolled it and found a bunch of grey bugs that are (I think) a bit bigger than aphids.

1. Are the wasps and bees trying to eat them? (Carnivorous bees????)
2. Is the shrub in trouble
3. Can this spread to the other shrubs and plants (rose at its base is ok so far)
4. Should I be doing something??
5. What is this bug?

Thanks for the help



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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2011 4:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the shrub I think is Viburnum opulus sterile. The pests are like aphids (greenflies) and are known to attack some varieties of Viburnum, but is rather unusual at this time of year. it is probably due to the unseasonal fine spell. I would not deem it serious enough to spray against it as nature will look after it with either natural predators or a change to cooler weather.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2011 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

afaik, wasps will carry the aphids back to the hive to feed them to the grubs - who then feed the wasps by exuding a sweet liquid. so they're doing you a favour.
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:20 pm    Post subject: Wasps and Bees "Eating" something in my something Reply with quote

I'm going for aphids as per Ml. Brenock. I recognise the blighters on sight from the excellent photo.

I have a plum tree which has been moidered with leaf curl for some years and the leaves on your viburnum look just like my plum tree right now.. It was only this Spring I finally discovered the plum is being eaten alive by aphids, and has been every year since I got it five years ago. The aphids attack the leaves at the back and the base of the leaf shortly after the leaves break out in 'Spring'.

Where I live, aphids get into full swing in late March or early April depending on the year and the temperature. Right npw they are swinging like the 80s.

My plum looks just like your viburnum. I understand that if I spray the whole tree with Bordeaux mixture next December, I may manage to stop the aphids taking hold next year. I'm not going to hold my breath though.

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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

tar oil winter wash spray was the old cure for killing aphid eggs. The spray is normally applied in November to January, full dormancy. It is very effective but will kill any grass growing underneath.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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walltoall
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:46 pm    Post subject: leaf curl in viburnum and plum Reply with quote

Thanks Michael. I'll put tar oil on my Winter shopping list.
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eggplant1
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 10:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for replies. I'm gutted to hear about the Plum tree as I have a one year old Queen Victoria who is showing signs now that she's flowering for her 2nd year. Out of interest how important is it to keep the base of the tree clear. if at all? I have small shrubs at the base of Queen Vic - Omphaloides Cappadocia (My absolute favorite!!!!!) and some Violets + a Gunnera I think. I have similar set ups at the base of a lot of my roses and also that Vibernum (thanks for identification) I personally like that overgrown cottage garden look but is it aphid heaven?
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eggplant1
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also may I ask where are aphid eggs usually located so that I know where to apply the tar oil winter wash spray (presuming I can find this as I've never seen or heard of it before. Hope small local "rural" suppliers will be able to help. Can you buy this online? Thanks
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eggplant1
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 10:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh and I get that the wasps are taking the aphids away - yippeee - but surely not the benign friendly bumble bee?? I'm really curious about their involvement.
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eggplant1
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 10:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Was doing on online search for tar oil winter wash and came across this but its from 2008!!! They mention a garlic equivalent. Has anyone heard of that?:

Quote:
Clifford Cain
Unfortunately tar oil sprays have had their pesticide safety certificate withdrawn and are no longer available for sale and illegal to use. Products like Jeyes Fluid and Armilatox were reformulated to remove the coal tar and now are outdoor cleaners, their use being restricted to those activities described on the label.

The 'winter tree wash' product currently available in garden centres is based on plant oils - rape seed oil. When using a 'winter tree wash' timing is important, since the options open to amateurs for controlling pests on fruit trees are becoming even more restricted - derris is scheduled to be de-listed as an approved product. They are contact products and repeat applications may be necessary to achieve an effect. 'Winter tree wash' needs to be used when the tree is dormant because it can scorch the leaves.

New products based on garlic claim to be effective against a number of pests and diseases and I am keen to try the one recommended as a 'winter tree wash', but currently this is only available in large quantities for commercial use, although may appear on the retail market in the future. Allicins the active ingredients in garlic and onions have anti-microbial, anti-fungal properties. Garlic extracts also contain a number of other sulphur based compounds. The garlic based 'winter tree wash' is directed to be used as a spray, diluted at 1:100 in water, 3-4 times during the winter. It differs from old products in that it can be used throughout the growing season, although not when the tree is in blossom. It is systemic, has no crop restrictions, does not taint the crop and also claims to offer protection against scab, woolly aphid and some deterrent effect to other sap sucking pests. Other garlic products in the garden centre are available for controlling carrot root fly and even slugs.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 9:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

aphid eggs (tiny black oval shaped) are usually located at or below the buds and are laid by the female in the late Autumn. These hatch out as winged females, under suitably warm conditions in Spring and feed on suitable vegetation that is emerging.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Mon May 02, 2011 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You can spray diluted washing-up liquid on roses to get rid of aphids, so I presume you can do the same here.

Use an old detergent spray gun, the sort you get in a supermarket.

And your shrub will be lovely and clean and shiney afterwards! Very Happy

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