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Tufa Rock.


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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 19, 2011 6:55 pm    Post subject: Tufa Rock. Reply with quote

Is there anywhere you can get Tufa Rock here?
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 31, 2013 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Got some Tufa, eventually. Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Fri Nov 01, 2013 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That took a while! Just out of interest what the hell is Tufa Rock?
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sat Nov 02, 2013 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, couldn't get any here. Sad

While I was in an alpine nursery in Derbyshire at the weekend, I saw some for sale there and picked up 4 pieces. I'll post pics of my troughs when I eventually install the stone.

Tufa is a very soft limestone rock that forms quickly when limey water flows over peatland. Unbelievably, plants will GROW in this rock, even, I've been told, acid loving plants! I'll be planting saxifrages in it.

Have a look at at
https://www.google.ie/search?q=growing+plants+in+tufa&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=LEN1UqX-I4Oihgf42YCgBA&ved=0CFgQsAQ&biw=1251&bih=667
to see what can be done.

And look at this.
http://alpines.dk/tufa-2/


Last edited by kindredspirit on Sun Nov 03, 2013 10:09 am; edited 1 time in total
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 03, 2013 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well we learn something new every day. Now that i see it I have a vague recollection from an old Gardeners World programme. Plenty of water in that rock to sustain the plants.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2013 12:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I remember a very old Gardener's World (Geoff Smith?) where they made "tufa" troughs with a mixture of vermiculite, peat and a little cement, using a cardboard box as a mould.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2013 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It was Geoff Hamilton I think....he was wonderful and so inventive, showing gardeners how to make whatever they needed out of inexpensive materials. The BBC have never found his equal since.... none of the presenters have quite filled those gardening boots, however pleasant they have been.
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tagwex
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 2013 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sive, we have been here before, no-one has or ever will fill Geoff Hamiltons boots.
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Its my field. Its my child. I nursed it. I nourished it. I saw to its every want. I dug the rocks out of it with my bare hands and I made a living thing of it!

This boy can really sing http://youtu.be/Dgv78D2duBE
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2013 6:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a Vimeo video explaining Tufa.

http://vimeo.com/19340505

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Good guy
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 12:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

An interesting video. Thanks for posting the link. The tufa seems to form in a similar way to the "Flowstone" you see in limestone caves, though that is hard and dense. I don't suppose you could grow anything much on it.
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tippben
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm dubious. Is tufa mined responsibly, with regard to habitat conservation? I remember limestone pavements being destroyed for the rockery craze. Is it linked to the destruction of rare peat based habitats? Does anyone know?
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baabamaal
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 20, 2013 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From a quick scan of d'interweb there doesn't appear to be issues about largescale habitat loss- the issue might be the removal of 'recent' tufa deposits in sensitive areas such as springs. The fossilised stuff seems to be fairly abundant and would be no more of an issue than gypsum removal. But that is only my uneducated opinion. Geoff's idea has been supersized however....http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertufa
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inishindie
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 21, 2014 1:23 pm    Post subject: Making my own Reply with quote

I'm having a go at the peat/vermiculite/cement/perlite/sand mixtures for hypertufa and having a bit of success I think. So much so I have set up a like and share page on facebook for someone to win one of the first made.

Enter here: https://www.facebook.com/hypertufapotsandcontainers

The pots seem light and strong but will need testing for a season, hopefully they will have things growing on them as well as in them!

It's easy to work with and can have as many air pockets as desired and manipulate the hypertufa to look like limestone outcrops.

I'm going to be trying wood shreds instead of peat too



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Cedrina
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 22, 2014 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Really liking those Inishindie, very attractive.
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Good guy
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beautifully done, Inishindie. I look forward to seeing some more planted up later in the season.
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