Irish Gardeners Forum Home
 FAQFAQ   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Custom Search
   
Weather Report /
Moon Phase for Ireland

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

How to Grow Sweet Corn on the cob in Irelands Veg Gardens


 
Most Recent Posts At last! A garden joke. (except maybe it's not a joke!)
Last post: kindredspirit
funny
Last post: Sue Deacon
2016 Vegetable quizz.
Last post: Sue Deacon
oops
Last post: Margo
 
Visit TheGardenShop.ie
Author Message
James Kilkelly
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Fri Dec 08, 2006 3:34 pm    Post subject: How to Grow Sweet Corn on the cob in Irelands Veg Gardens Reply with quote

How to Grow Sweet Corn!
By Terry Blackburn

Growing Sweet Corn

Sweet corn is one vegetable that even children enjoy if they are troublesome about eating their greens; few kids reject the bright yellow cobs of sweet, juicy corn.
To grow good sweet corn it requires plenty of space, to gain rapid growth, moisture and nutrients.
Corn should not be planted into cold, wet soil as such conditions encourage fungi, which can rapidly rot the seeds.

Soil Preparation

Almost any soil suits sweet corn provided that it has been well manured.
The soil should be dug to a spade's depth and add half a bucketful of compost and manure to the sq. yd.
A couple of days before planting, rake into the top inch of soil some peat substitute to lighten up the soil a little adding fish manure at 4 oz. (120g) to the sq. yd.

Sowing

To get the corn off to a good start, sow the seeds into John Innes seed compost that is warm and moist during March.
It helps germination if the seed is first soaked in water for about 4 hours prior to sowing.
Sow two seeds in the centre of a 2-in (50mm) pot then thin down to one plant per pot if both seeds germinate.
The pot should stand on staging in the greenhouse at a temperature of 55 deg F. (13 deg C.) water when necessary.
Early May begin to harden off by putting the plants out into a cold frame.
Plant out in late May or early June depending on your location.
To aid pollination, plant in 2 by 1 ft. (30cm) rectangles rather than in rows.


Photo / pic / image of Sweet Corn.
_____________________________________________________________

Need more materials?


Irish home delivery.

Need more materials?


UK home delivery.

Need more materials?


US home delivery.



- Sweetcorn seed bargains-
CLICK HERE.





-Sweetcorn seed bargains-
CLICK HERE.





- Sweetcorn seed bargains-
CLICK HERE.






If you do not have a greenhouse the seeds can be sown where they are to grow out in the open in 2 by 1 ft. (30cm) stations in late May.
As before plant two seeds per station to begin with, later only one should be allowed to develop.
To give a little protection cut down clear plastic mineral bottles can be placed over the top until the seedlings are about 3 in (76mm) high.

General Care

Earth up the plants when they are about 1 ft. (30cm) high so that they will produce stronger roots that will give them more support as they grow.
Keep them well watered and give a mulch to retain moisture. Do not remove the tassels at the top of the plant; these constitute the male portion of the plant, which supplies the pollen.
The fine, yellow dust is of course the pollen shed by the tassels and it will fall onto the silk of the cob, this is the female portion of the plant. If no pollen falls onto the silk, a kernel will not form.
Choose early maturing varieties and ensure that if you are growing different varieties that they are kept apart as cross-pollination can occur if they are planted together.
Unless of course their maturity dates have a difference of at least 7 days.
In such circumstances, when one variety is shedding pollen, the others will not be receptive to pollen.

Harvesting

The cobs should be ready for harvesting about three weeks after flowering finishes.
The tassels will turn brown and lose much of their silkiness.
Pull back the protecting green sheath and press one or two of the grains with your thumb. If they are ready they will spurt out a thick creamy juice. As soon as the cobs are harvested, the sugars in the kernels quickly convert to starches and so they become less sweet.
To ensure maximum sweetness, the cobs should be immersed in ice-cold water as soon as possible after picking and kept in the water until eaten.

Terry Blackburn. Internet Marketing Consultant, living in South Shields in the North-East of England. Author and Producer of blog http://www.lawnsurgeon.blogspot.com Author of "Your Perfect Lawn," a 90 Page eBook devoted to Lawn Preparation, Lawn Care and Maintenance.

_________________
Gardening books.

http://www.allotments.ie/ Ireland's allotments.
On Twitter... http://twitter.com/Allotments

Garden Consultation & Design.

Try my Garden Design home study course!
.
.


Last edited by James Kilkelly on Sat Mar 05, 2011 10:37 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Loncey
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 14 Aug 2007
Posts: 68
Location: Co.Mayo (Achill, by the sea)

PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2007 11:18 am    Post subject: sweetcorn Reply with quote

my sweetcorn have the tassel on the top and have 2cobs.they were doing fine but now that it is raining again,the leaves have turned brown.id say the cobs have been there for 1week now,do you think they will be alright?it is my first time growing sweetcorn
_________________
I grow veg but I dont eat them!!! or fruit....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BlackBird
Rank attained: Ash Tree
Rank attained: Ash Tree


Joined: 25 Jan 2007
Posts: 227

PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2007 11:43 pm    Post subject: Leaves have turned brown on corn, will they will be alright? Reply with quote

I,d say leave them at least another week or two before harvesting. All the rain we had may have caused the leaves to turn brown quicker. I'm sure the corn will benefit from the week of sun we are promised currently.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Loncey
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 14 Aug 2007
Posts: 68
Location: Co.Mayo (Achill, by the sea)

PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 11:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thanks, i was thinking of doing that just to be on the safe side.on another plant has just got a cob as well so that should be alright when i come back from holiday. thanks
_________________
I grow veg but I dont eat them!!! or fruit....
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
foxroxks
Rank attained: Rowan Tree
Rank attained: Rowan Tree


Joined: 11 Jan 2009
Posts: 111
Location: Ballyfermot

PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2009 9:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I didnt know you needed to earth up sweetcorn. My corn is a good bit over a 1ft should i still earth up & what is best to use. I have compost & manure, are these 2 rich to put on direct should i just use topsoil if i should still earth up.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
sirpsycho
Rank attained: Pedunculate oak tree


Joined: 15 Mar 2010
Posts: 341
Location: Stamullen, Co Meath

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 9:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is it too late to start sweet corn in a greenhouse now? I'm going to get some planted this weekend but I was wondering would I be better buying plants instead?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

you are still on time to start sweetcorn from seed this week, if you start with plants now you will have an earlier and bigger crop. The cobs may be bigger and there may be more than one cob on each plant. The seed can be sown outside directly now so that there is no transplanting. Cover the sown seed with a sheet of fleece or plastic to raise temperatures.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

_________________
michael brenock
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bruckey99
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 21 Feb 2011
Posts: 6
Location: The west

PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Instead of covering the seed in a sheet of fleece or plastic could you use some straw?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

no straw acts as an insulator and will have the opposite effect. Use glass or plastic or fleece, all these will help raise temperature and keep off cold winds.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

_________________
michael brenock
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group

Privacy Policy | Copyright © 2006 - 2016 IrishGardeners.com (part of GardenPlansIreland.com)