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Advice on Apple tree?


 
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loostep
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 20 May 2009
Posts: 31
Location: cork

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 8:49 pm    Post subject: Advice on Apple tree? Reply with quote

Hello,
I have a small space in my garden that I would like to plant an apple tree in, I would like a small one that doesn't grow too tall, and is self pollinating. I only really have room for one tree.
Thanks for any advice you can offer.
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nemo
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009
Posts: 94
Location: kildangan kildare

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

try future forests in cork they have a good selection
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medieval knievel
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Joined: 03 Sep 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

irishseedsavers would be a good choice too.
size is determined by rootstock, so you can get most varieties in most sizes.
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tippben
Rank attained: Vegetable garden tender


Joined: 15 Jan 2011
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Location: north tipperary

PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 12:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Off the top of my head, Cox's orange pippin and James Grieve (my favourite eater) are self fertile eating apples. Bramley is the usual cooker. All are fertilised by bees, and also by wild crab apples, so get in touch with your local beekeeping association to find the nearest hive- bees work in a 3 mile radius from the hive.

I'd second the suggestion to contanct seed savers.Whatever you get, it sounds like you need a small rootstock. M27 is the very smallest, designed for pots, or very well prepared ground, and never gets above 6'. M26 is next, 10 to 12' in height (and spread eventually)

Bear in mind that you will need to prune your trees every year, and that ultimate height and spred on a plant label refers to 20+ years time if left unpruned. If you choose a smaller cultivar, the crop will be in proportion. Pick all fruit off on the first year, and only allow a bowlful to form in the second year. This is a long term project! Good luck!
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Qzy
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 11 Sep 2009
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Location: North Roscommon

PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tippben wrote:
Off the top of my head, Cox's orange pippin and James Grieve (my favourite eater) are self fertile eating apples. Bramley is the usual cooker. !


Cox's Orange Pippin tends to need a lot of spraying and is not very resistant to scab etc. James Grieve is a nice early apple but does not keep. Bramley is Triploid so needs 2 other pollinators. I would have little worries about pollinatiors as there tends to be loads of apple trees about though. Have a look at Irishseedsavers or fuitandnut.ie for some very good ideas.

Personally I have planted Irish Peach, Kerry Pippin, Discovery, Scarlet Crofton, Anne Elizabeth, Katy, Peasgood Nonsuch, Bramley, Cox's Pippin, Golden Delicious, Pitmaston Pineapple and Jonagold to date but none of them are there long enough to give a strong opinion.
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Feb 09, 2011 2:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is it to be a dessert apple (eater) or maybe you would like to grow some culinary apples commonly known as cookers. This all comes down to a matter of personal taste, if you like your apples sweet, tart, crunchy or soft only you will know. It would be worth your while to sample different types of apples from your local fruit shop to ascertain which varieties of apple are for you. It can be very disappointing to wait 4 years for your first apple harvest, only to find your face contorts with the sourness of the first bite.

Try the following tree types if you prefer your dessert apples sweet and juicy...
* Cox's Orange Pippin,
* Fiesta,
* Fortune,
* Jonagold,
* Jupiter.

If you like less sweetness and more acidity in your eating apple why not try one of these...
* Discovery,
* James Grieve (Part self-fertile)
* Greensleeves. (Part self-fertile)

Discovery has the added bonus of being resistant to scab, a harmless enough surface blemish, but one which turns a lot of people off apples.
However, it requires another tree to act as pollinator to bear good fruit, possibilities include.... Fiesta, James Grieve, Katy, Cox's Orange Pippin, Epicure, and Granny Smith

The culinary or cooking apples nearly all tend to be very acidic such as...
* Bramleys Seedling,
* Grenadier (Part self-fertile)
* Rev. W. Wilks.

For very small sites (or container growing) chose an apple tree with M27 rootstock, this limits the growth to approx 1 metre in height with a similar spread in a bush-like shape. Moving up in size is the M26 rootstock, which gives you a slightly larger tree at 2 metres by 2 metres. Apple trees grown on these M27 and M26 rootstocks can be expected to produce a reasonable crop of fruit after 3 years. The most commonly planted apple tree rootstock is the MM106, causing trees to grow to an eventual height and spread of 4 metres.
This is a great rootstock for medium sized and larger gardens, producing up to 50lbs of fruit when mature. It takes longer to begin producing fruit with a wait of 5 years common, but its well worth the wait.

More info can be found here in my apple tree planting article........ Apple tree selection and planting.

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