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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

evergreen frost proof hedging ?


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mofox
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:58 pm    Post subject: evergreen frost proof hedging ? Reply with quote

Does evergreen frost proof hedging exist ?
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 31, 2011 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

holly; slow growing though.
cherry laurel?
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 7:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ordinary laurel

conifers

Aucuba Japonica (slow growing, though.)

Yew (slow growing)

Beech has lovely brown leaves in the winter.
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michelle M
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm thinking alone the same lines, mofox. I've had new grisellinia hedges killed two years in a row now and a section of escallonia also
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Sive
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you sure your escallonia is dead Michelle? It may just be bare due to the disease that has started to affect it in the last couple of years......
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mountainy man
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Olearia macrodonta, holly, yew, viburnum tinus, berberis darwinii, pyracantha rogersiana, various hebes, eleagnus.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The nicest real hedging in my opinion is that old fashioned hedging that you see around old cottages.
It has a small evergreen leaf, similar to Box.
Don't know the name of it. We just used to call it hedge!


Last edited by kindredspirit on Thu Feb 03, 2011 2:00 pm; edited 1 time in total
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Olearia macrodonta, holly, yew, viburnum tinus, berberis darwinii, pyracantha rogersiana, various hebes, eleagnus.


They may have survived for you this year mountainy man, but I would not class Olearia macrodonta and hebes as true hardy individual, even eleagnus can be dodgy.
The others though are pretty tough.

Quote:
The nicest real hedging in my opinion is that old fashoined hedging that you see around old cottages.
It has a small evergreen leaf, similar to Box.
Don't know the name of it. We just used to call it hedge!


kindredspirit I'd say you are thinking of Lonicera nitida (poor mans box / honeysuckle hedge) which when spaced at 30cm (1 ft) creates an evergreen hedge 6 to 8ft tall at a moderate growth rate.
A hedge that looks shaggy very quickly, pruning required at least twice a year. See it below.......


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Her Outdoors
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mountainy man wrote:
Olearia macrodonta,.


My lovely big Olearia Macrodonta was practically killed off by last years frost. The piece that survived looks like it has been finished off by this years severe frost. So sad as it is a beautiful shrub, particularly when it flowers.

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newdawn47
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've come here looking for sympathy as only other gardeners will understand my grief at loosing my beautiful garden to frost. I feel so very sad right now. I know its only a garden(as I've been told) but I loved it. I have spent the last 20yrs digging, moving, setting, complaining and loving every bit of it. I am like a caged animal in winter waiting for the spring so I can get out there with the birds. I have lost 20feet of olearia hedging, my boundary, escallonia, hebe's, etc.

OK I have to try and look forward and start again. I was told that Leylandii trees were fast growing, were frost and sea wind resistant. Has anyone any knowledge on this or some other form of plant for a boundary.
Fellow gardeners sorry for going on.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 02, 2011 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leylandi are fast growing, frost and wind resistant but I would NOT recommend them.

They just keep growing and growing and growing and growing. They're trees not shrubs and it's a shrub that makes the best hedge for an ordinary garden.

I've Escallonia and it's perfect. Not a leaf lost this winter and yet up to about 30 other varieties of plants in the garden are either dead or badly damaged from the frost.
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mountainy man
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2011 2:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok folks, I must have the hardiest shrubs in the country, the past three winters have been very severe here and i live at 255m asl and am very exposed, had down to -12 here in december and snow on the ground for a month, even had an inch of snow this evening . The only things I lost last winter was a eucalyptus gunnii and rosemary. Most of my trees and shrubs were planted during the winter of 06/07 and have grown quite slowly due to the conditions(growing season is a month shorter tha in my previous garden at 85m asl) perhaps this has contributed to the hardiness of things in my garden. Mabey I should start propagating and selling my indistructable , artic friendly shrubs Laughing
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2011 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Ok folks, I must have the hardiest shrubs in the country, the past three winters have been very severe here and i live at 255m asl and am very exposed, had down to -12 here in december and snow on the ground for a month, even had an inch of snow this evening .


Exposure usually has a tempering effect on cold damage to plants.
A sheltered garden with similar temps to -12 would cause severe damage to non-hardy plant tissue.
It's an ill wind that blows no good mountainy man. Wink

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newdawn47
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kindredspirit wrote:
Leylandi are fast growing, frost and wind resistant but I would NOT recommend them.

They just keep growing and growing and growing and growing. They're trees not shrubs and it's a shrub that makes the best hedge for an ordinary garden.

I've Escallonia and it's perfect. Not a leaf lost this winter and yet up to about 30 other varieties of plants in the garden are either dead or badly damaged from the frost.


Could I cut them every year? I had to do that with my hedging anyway. Oh I made a mistake on my info. I have 120 feet of boundary
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Sive
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 11:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a very long stretch for a formal hedge....would you consider a mixed native hedge ? Are you living in a rural area ? It may look more natural, and you have the satisfaction of supporting wildlife too.....can't imagine leylandii doing much for wildlife somehow.
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