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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Shrubs in Ireland ... Hedging in Ireland

evergreen frost proof hedging ?


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Her Outdoors
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 4:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am not a fan of Leylandi, but they do have their uses. We are on a very high open site and needed to seperate two gardens. We needed shelter for the vegetable garden and the chicken coop is the other side in the "wild garden". Forty Leylandi provided the shelter and also shelters the polyhouse. We do top them each year and have managed to keep them at 8' high. We also trim them on either side. I think if you need a wind break and you are prepared to keep it in trim then they can work. We have various little hedges around the boundry including pheasant berry & berberis which are slow growing.
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newdawn47
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 10:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sive wrote:
That's a very long stretch for a formal hedge....would you consider a mixed native hedge ? Are you living in a rural area ? It may look more natural, and you have the satisfaction of supporting wildlife too.....can't imagine leylandii doing much for wildlife somehow.


Hi Sive,
Yes we live in a rural area and we love wildlife. What would you suggest. It would also have to be a boundary as we have neighbours very close, right up against our boundary, we would like some privacy.
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Sive"]Are you sure your escallonia is dead Michelle? It may just be bare due to the disease that has started to affect it in the last couple of y
ears......[/quote


]Hope your right Sive otherwise I've about 200mts of Escallonias to replace.
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newdawn47
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Her Outdoors wrote:
I am not a fan of Leylandi, but they do have their uses. We are on a very high open site and needed to seperate two gardens. We needed shelter for the vegetable garden and the chicken coop is the other side in the "wild garden". Forty Leylandi provided the shelter and also shelters the polyhouse. We do top them each year and have managed to keep them at 8' high. We also trim them on either side. I think if you need a wind break and you are prepared to keep it in trim then they can work. We have various little hedges around the boundry including pheasant berry & berberis which are slow growing.


Hi,
8feet sounds good, that was the height of my hedge. In your experience how fast did they grow?
Like you we had beautiful 'gold brian' along our hedge, we kept them at 5ft, oh the contrast was gorgeous, both have died sadly.
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Sive
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi newdawn.....there have been some good discussions on this very topic on the forum before, so rather than repeating it all, maybe try a couple of searches on the site and see if any of the information helps you to decide what to do.
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Her Outdoors
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ours took around two years to get going - mainly because the soil was quite poor and they took quite a battering from the wind. Once they got going they grew quite quickly. We gave them the first trim after about four years (they are six years in now) and we cut them each September/October. It takes about half a day but time well spent. Like I said - not my favourite - but they do the job.
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newdawn47
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 06, 2011 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks outdoors for replying and for all the info.
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jameswburke
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 25, 2011 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

newdawn47 wrote:
Sive wrote:
That's a very long stretch for a formal hedge....would you consider a mixed native hedge ? Are you living in a rural area ? It may look more natural, and you have the satisfaction of supporting wildlife too.....can't imagine leylandii doing much for wildlife somehow.


Hi Sive,
Yes we live in a rural area and we love wildlife. What would you suggest. It would also have to be a boundary as we have neighbours very close, right up against our boundary, we would like some privacy.



Re traditional hedging, Coilte Nurseries, in Ardattin, Co. Carlow sell native hedging bareroot plants at great prices. Easily found on Google.
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willow2670
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 23, 2011 8:35 pm    Post subject: Hedging & severe weather Reply with quote

I too have seem to have lost my 15 year laurel hedging due to the severe weather.

As I now need to replace it can any one suggest something that's more robust & when should i start planting?

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Sive
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about beech...or hornbeam if your soil is heavy. And you should plant immediately as we're reaching the end of the bare-root season.
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Rommel
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 15, 2011 7:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi everyone. Im new and this is my 1st post. I had 125' of escollonia in Kerry and as im sure is common, its dead. Id love something frost hardy, fast growing, evergreen and if at all.something native. I would be happy to mix and match. Can i be given any assistance on this? Kind regards..Rommel.
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