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Cleaning and maintaning trees


 
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daigo75
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree


Joined: 23 Feb 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 5:04 pm    Post subject: Cleaning and maintaning trees Reply with quote

Hi once again!
I have several trees in the garden, some seem to be plums but their fruits are tiny, the size of a cherry (and incredibly sour). I'm not an expert of fruit trees, could it be that they became "wild" because of the lack of care? In such case, are they recoverable?
Also, many of the trees have been taken over by blackberries. They are heavily tangled, it's like a giant "cage of thorns". Any recommendation on how to remove them?

Finally, in the garden there are several beautiful old horse chestnuts, but they have never been pruned. Their bases are a mess of branches, ivy and other plants, they would look so much better if they were clean! Is there a recommended approach in these cases? I've never dealt with trees before and I don't have tools, so I'd like to get some information before embarking in this "adventure". Thanks! Smile
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kindredspirit
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Joined: 10 Nov 2008
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Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The "plum" trees are Blackthorn and the fruit is called "Sloe".
You can squash the fruit and make an alcoholic beverage out of them!
If you've a large area to clear, then a JCB is best. For a small area, you just need a slashhook and good gloves.

On your Horse Chestnuts, are the lower branches Horse Chestnut or just other shrubs?
If they're Horse Chestnut then the tree was pollarded at some point. If they're just other shrubby growth, then do the same action as you are going to do with the Blackthorn.
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daigo75
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks kindredspirit. The fruit of these trees tastes terrible, I wonder how I could make anything good from it. Razz
By the way, what is JCB?

Regarding the trees, I guess they are shrubs or "shoots" of something. Definitely not the result of pollarding, the tree is huge and has the typical "chestnut tree shape", it hasn't been manipulated (or maintained). I reckon it would need a good pruning to tidy up its branches, though, but it would require someone who's not afraid of climbing all the way up! Smile
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

daigo75 wrote:
By the way, what is JCB?

one of these babies:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:JCB_407_vorne.jpg
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daigo75
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, that would be overkill! Very Happy
Especially because the brambles are all around small trees that I'd like to keep. I'm aware that blackberries are hardy plants, but I wonder if it would be possible to pull them out, or would they just regrow again and again and super fast?
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

do you have a photo of the area?
one thing to bear in mind is that the 'messiness' is probably good for wildlife in your garden. it provides shelter and food for animals, so you may lose out on a lot of that if you clean it up.
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daigo75
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 1:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll have to take pictures, but I agree with you, the "mess" is actually very wild, it probably helps birds and other animals to hide and build their nests. The landlord never wanted to have a "manicured garden", also the grass is fairly rough.
However, I think some trees would benefit from a cleanup, but 'm afraid I don't have the resources to do it Sad
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If the landlord wants it wild, then why not leave it wild?
Just make narrow pathways through it.
Wild is lovely.

We need pics really. Without pics, everyones guessing.

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daigo75
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The landlord doesn't really want it wild, he told me he doesn't mind it, but he also agrees some cleaning is needed. I'll take some pictures this weekend, with daylight, just to give an idea. It's not a matter of "redoing" everything, just "tidying up". Smile
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 19, 2011 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Further reading here.........Irish native Blackthorn tree / sloe / Prunus spinosa / Draigean
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