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Rabbits and deers


 
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daigo75
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
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Joined: 23 Feb 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 4:52 pm    Post subject: Rabbits and deers Reply with quote

Hi all,
I live very close to a forest, which brings with it a constant presence of rabbits (recently reduced in number by Myxomatosis, but still a threat). Amongst the visitors there are also deers, even if less frequently. Any suggestion on how to deal with them? Possibly cheaply, I'm renting and I cannot spend too much as I could have to remove it in a few years.
Thanks in advance for the suggestions. Smile
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kindredspirit
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Joined: 10 Nov 2008
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Location: Mid-west.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 5:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheapest answer would be a dog.
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medieval knievel
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

a .22?
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If money was no object then i would say to erect a rabbit proof fence with a mesh size no wider than 25-30mm (1in) around your property or vulnerable plantings. Something similar to the one shown below.......



The lower vertical 6 inches of fence may be classed as overkill be certain gardeners. Whether you go to this extreme all depends on how determined your rabbits are to get into your site.
To prevent deer wandering in this fence would want to be a minimum of 2 metres high.

If fencing is in place, ensure gates are kept closed as often as possible.

Arrow Get yourself a dog and let it roam the garden to scare the bunnies off.

For short term protection many gardeners have reported good success tying up bundles of dog hair with thread and leave them around the perimeter of their property and strewn through the vulnerable beds and borders. You will require lots of dog hair, or alternatively you can also use barbers hair, so ask to take yours home with you the next time you visit. This works on the rabbit picking up the scent of another animal, so is not as effective in wet weather.

Similar to the hair idea, there are many chemical scent products available which can be applied around the garden to repel rabbits. Again these are for short term protection and are not as effective in wet weather. many gardeners will use homemade versions of these such as mothballs or teabags soaked in olbas oil spread around the site.

Some deer prevention products that may be able to help you here... deer repellent.

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daigo75
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 18, 2011 9:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you all for the suggestions. I was thinking of a dog, but I think my landlord would object about it (he already agreed about my vegetable garden, though). Besides, I already have two big adult cats and they would attack any other newcomer; that would cause an issue with an adult dog. A puppy would take too long to grow to be useful...

On the other hand, money is an issue. I saw several solutions with nets and fences, but they are quite expensive (although I believe they are very effective). Besides, I don't know how long I'll rent here, I could have to dismantle everything in one or two years... I'm in a "cul de sac"!
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JK Mayo
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Joined: 04 May 2013
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Location: Mayo

PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 5:41 pm    Post subject: Horse Proof Fence Reply with quote

Hi James,

I will be planting a hedge either during the summer or most likely in the Autumn, dormant period.

I was planning to use green mesh to protect it from grazing sheep, however I was recently reminded that horses also use the field next door.

Can you recommend a fence type that would provide the necessary protection but still look good, visually, in a rural setting?

Thanks
JK

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Greengage
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Joined: 09 Nov 2011
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Location: Kildare

PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Electric
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