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How to prune raspberry plants for good fruit.


 
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Red
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 6:41 pm    Post subject: How to prune raspberry plants for good fruit. Reply with quote

I planted some raspberries in spring of last year; they produced good growth but little fruit. How should I prune them to cause better fruiting in their third year, as id say im to late for this years fruit. how to go about pruning raspberry bushes and when? I promise I will start providing info to ye when I can. It seems all I am doing is asking questions. Rolling Eyes
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
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Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:24 pm    Post subject: pruning raspberry plants for good fruit in Ireland. Reply with quote

Thats ok Red, feel free to add your input to any topic.
Now the irish raspberries.
Often the first season's crop on raspberries and most soft fruit bushes can be quite tiny due to establishment of roots, however with correct pruning and feeding next seasons crop will be more bountiful.
Carry out the first pruning the following spring after planting, do this when new raspberry shoots start to appear from ground level.
At this time the old raspberry canes should be cut down to just above ground level with a sharp secateurs.
About a week or so later when the cut canes start to heal you can apply a granular fruit tree fertiliser which is high in potash to aid fruiting, apply this fertiliser which is readily available in garden centres according to instructions on package.
The next and subsequent years pruning of the plants depends on whether fruiting occurs in summer or autumn.
Summer fruiting raspberries canes are cut down to just above ground level after fruit picking, whilst leaving uncut seven young unfruiting canes.
If the raspberry plant fruits in autumn, simply cut down all canes to just above ground level in February.

There ya go.
Smile
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verge
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 7:42 pm    Post subject: mulch the raspberries for fruit Reply with quote

To help fruiting, mulch the raspberry plants. Just lay down a 1 to 2 inch layer of well rotted farm yard manure or garden compost after weeding around the plants. Do not allow the compost to touch the stems. A mulch will feed the plants and retain moisture in the soil. Giving you more fruit.
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sorcha
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2008 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've just had quite a surprise, in that I've discovered what seems to be a raspberry bush sprouting in a neglected corner of my garden (the ripe berries caught my attention!) They are growing in behind the compost bin and a blackthorn tree and are not the easiest to get at right now, so I'm wondering if it would be possible to move them to a more convenient location, when the best time would be to do this (after they stop fruiting!) and if I need to do anything else to encourage them in the meantime?

At the moment, that little patch has a fine cover of creeping buttercup and some broken paving stones from the previous owner's DIY experiments.There seems to be a fairly healthy crop on it (am making raspberry sorbet at the moment!)
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 6:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sorcha wrote:
so I'm wondering if it would be possible to move them to a more convenient location, when the best time would be to do this (after they stop fruiting!) and if I need to do anything else to encourage them in the meantime?


Congrats on your discovery sorcha. Smile
Best time to move would be in autumn when the plant sheds its leaves.
You will be pleased to know that raspberries have good success rates as transplants.
This post on transplanting has lots of tips which are suitable for use on your raspberry (Trans) planting.

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sorcha
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 16, 2008 2:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks GPI, that looks really useful - I'll bear it in mind when I go to move it (or them, as I've just spotted a couple of smaller canes as well, although those haven't even flowered yet...)
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sorcha
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Me again, never managed to transplant the canes, but they're still going strong and fruiting away this year. Probably a dumb question, but should I be 'dead-heading' the bits left on the plant, when I pick each of the berries? There seems to be a lot of dead heads left on the canes and I was speculating that it might make them fruit a bit more, as well as providing less fuel for the slugs...
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

no need to dead head the raspberries because once they( the canes) have finished fruiting they die and the new canes that grow (there already) will produce next years crop.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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