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Planting an Oak close to house, how close?


 
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bold_defender
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2006 2:40 pm    Post subject: Planting an Oak close to house, how close? Reply with quote

What distance is reasonable to leave between a oak and a house in terms of root damage.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2006 4:07 pm    Post subject: Planting an Oak close to house Reply with quote

Hello bold_defender,
Welcome to Irish Gardeners.
I would class an oak tree as a forest tree, wide in canopy and root.
No forest tree should be planted within 20 mtrs of a house, ideally 30mtrs.

However, you may not have a true oak tree, maybe it is a cultivated variety.
If it is, then you may be able to plant it closer.
Supply us with the Latin name as printed on the label (if any).
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Bugs
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2006 7:10 pm    Post subject: Re: Planting an Oak close to house Reply with quote

bold_defender wrote:
What distance is reasonable to leave between a oak and a house in terms of root damage.


How old do they live? -- Oak trees can live 200 or more years. The largest oak tree of record is the Wye oak in the community of Wye Mills in Talbot County on Maryland's eastern shore in the U.S.A. It is believed to be more than 400 years old, and it measures 9 meters (~ 32 feet) in circumference, it is 31 meters (~ 105 feet) tall with a crown spread of 48.1 meters (~ 158 feet).
Hope this helps
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2006 7:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And that tree probably stopped its main growth spurt around about year 200.
So I guess you could say that under good growing conditions that an oak tree will put on 1 mtr of crown spread every 4 to 8 years.
With a possible similar root spread.
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verge
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 03, 2006 8:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi bold_defender. If you choose to plant the traditional English oak its botanical name is Quercus robur. It is also known as French oak, Black oak, , Pedunculate oak, Slavonian oak or Polish oak. A nice tree but quite slow growing.
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