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How to Grow Broad Beans in Irelands Vegetable Garden (Fava)


 
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 20, 2006 4:43 pm    Post subject: How to Grow Broad Beans in Irelands Vegetable Garden (Fava) Reply with quote

How to Grow Broad Beans in Irelands Vegetable Garden (Fava beans)
By Terry Blackburn

Broad beans are one of the oldest known vegetables and certainly one of my own favourites.
These beans are easy to grow being hardy so can be sown in autumn as well as in spring.
They do not seem to suffer from any real adversaries if certain steps are taken to discourage pests before they become a problem.
One advantage is that they will grow in any soil whether light or heavy.
Beans are high in protein, fibre and other essential vitamins and minerals.

Soil Preparation

Autumn sown seeds should go into well-manured beds from the previous crop.
Alternatively two or three weeks before the crop is sown, work into the soil plenty of well-rotted manure and compost.
At the time of sowing lightly fork a fish manure with 10 per cent potash contend into the ground at 3 oz. (90g) to the sq. yd.
There is a variety of named broad bean seeds to choose from, including some excellent dwarf ones, some with dark coloured pods that look particularly attractive.


Photo / pic / image of Broad Beans .
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Sowing


If it's an early crop that you want, then sow long-pods can be sown in boxes in John Innes seed compost in a greenhouse or cold frame about the middle of December or early January, where they should remain until at least the end of March when they can be planted out in the beds.
For most of us the first sowing will be out-doors in April, then a second sowing for late crops about the beginning of May.

After the soil has been raked level and fish manure has been scattered on the surface, a hoe can be used to draw out 3 in. (76mm) deep drills.
Space out the seeds to about 8 in. (203mm) apart then make another drill roughly about 8 in. away, making another row keeping the same distance between the seeds.
This is known as a double row method.
The next set of double rows should be positioned about 2½ ft. (75cm) away.
The distance between dwarf seeds should be a little less, 6 in. (15cm) apart and 6 in (15cm) between the rows for the doubles with a distance of 2 ft.(60cm) to the next double rows.
It is always a good idea to sow a few extra seeds at the end of each row so that should there be any gaps, these may be used to fill in the spaces.

General Care


Keep down weeds between the rows with the aid of a Dutch hoe, a most useful implement for getting between the plants easily.
To discourage pests such as black fly, which can become a serious problem, pinch out the top inch of the growing tip of each plant as soon as the first flowers appear.
The tip of the plant is tender and succulent and will attract these aphids in there thousands.
However there is another advantage to "stopping" the plants as it encourages the production of earlier beans.
This "pinching" method has always worked well for me and as I would never use chemicals to deter insects, I am keen to keep a close eye on the beans to ensure that I spot the first sign of the coming flowers.

Harvesting

Pick the pods whilst the beans inside are still young and tender, though they need to be of a reasonable size to make them a worthwhile crop.
The ideal size is about half an inch in diameter.

Terry Blackburn. Internet Marketing Consultant, living in South Shields in the North-East of England. Author and Producer of blog http://www.lawnsurgeon.blogspot.com Author of "Your Perfect Lawn," a 90 Page eBook devoted to Lawn Preparation, Lawn Care and Maintenance. Find it at http://www.lawnsurgeon.com

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Last edited by James Kilkelly on Mon Jun 23, 2008 10:26 am; edited 1 time in total
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Rebecca
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do broad beans produce new flowers and more beans when harvested like peas (the more you pick the more are produced) or is there just a single once off crop?

They can be planted amongst the stalks of last years sweet corn which act as supports. I hope to try this out next season.
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James Kilkelly
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rebecca wrote:
Do broad beans produce new flowers and more beans when harvested like peas (the more you pick the more are produced) or is there just a single once off crop?

They can be planted amongst the stalks of last years sweet corn which act as supports. I hope to try this out next season.


Good tip about the sweetcorn suppport Rebecca.
Yep, harvesting the broad beans be for the seeds (beans) inside are mature will result in more flowers and then beans, provide water and nutrient reserves are available to do so.
Allowing some pods to go unharvested and the seed set will result in the plant switching off bean production as it feels its job is done at that time.
As mentioned above.... "Pick the pods whilst the beans inside are still young and tender, though they need to be of a reasonable size to make them a worthwhile crop. The ideal size is about half an inch in diameter. "
Let me add to pick when the pod is about 15cm long and the beans firm and crisp.
In dry weather, twist and pull to remove them, but be careful to leave the plant undamaged.

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Yorky
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PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2010 8:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is plastic garden mesh suitable for supporting broad beans?
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sal
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PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

i`m trying broad beans this year in the polytunnel ,dh is putting the tunnel up but is waiting now for a still day,if that ever happens,
in the mean time i`m planting mine in empty toilet rolls filled with compost,hope they survive and dont die off in the wait?
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mcgrueser
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PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 9:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there really a need to put them in the tunnel? I mean, they are a veg that doesnt need a lot of heat and to put them in your polytunnel seems like a bit of a waste of time and space that could go towards something that'd appreciate it more. This time of year, and earlier, you could just bang the broad bean seeds straight into the ground. I reckon you're giving yourself hassle by doing this, especially for a veg that, like James says above, is easy to grow....though that is just my opinion and don't mean to burst your bubble or anything...
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sal
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PostPosted: Wed May 19, 2010 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

no its just i have chickens that devour anything young and green,
11 hens,1 cockerel and one 10 day old chick,to be precise,the weeds they can have,wouldnt like to chance it,
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mcgrueser
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PostPosted: Wed May 19, 2010 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm mad to get a few hens myself but just can't at the minute. I hear there's not too much work involved when you are set up, and i just love the idea of going out and bringing in fresh eggs every morning...the dream!
So i guess when i do gets hen i'm going to need to make some cages, or some other protection, for my young seedlings outside...

Do u put the hens into the tunnel over the winter? I've heard good things about doing that...
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mcgrueser
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PostPosted: Wed May 19, 2010 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm mad to get a few hens myself but just can't at the minute. I hear there's not too much work involved when you are set up, and i just love the idea of going out and bringing in fresh eggs every morning...the dream!

So i guess when i do get hens i'm going to need to make some cages, or some other protection, for my young seedlings outside...

Do u put the hens into the tunnel over the winter? I've heard good things about doing that...
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Rita
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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 6:55 am    Post subject: Beans in tunnell Reply with quote

Quote:
i`m trying broad beans this year in the polytunnel ,dh is putting the tunnel up but is waiting now for a still day,if that ever happens,
in the mean time i`m planting mine in empty toilet rolls filled with compost,hope they survive and dont die off in the wait?


hi I have both beans and peas in pollytunnell this year, last year they were all attacked by fly, and lost them all, i have more control in tunnell, see how it goes, keep u posted.
R

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