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Tomato blight


 
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DanyFish
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 11 Aug 2010
Posts: 3
Location: Dublin

PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 4:07 pm    Post subject: Tomato blight Reply with quote

Hey, I'm new to the forums but I did do a search on this topic and didn't find the answer to my questions. Apologies if its tucked away somewhere.

I started growing tomatoes this year as my garden isn't used for anything else. I figured I'd try grow one thing this year and if I enjoyed it I'd branch out the following year. Anyway, the tomatoes were doing very well up until the end of last week. I started noticing some of the leaves on a couple of plants were drying up and then I started noticing brown patches on the fruit. I did some research on the internet and I'm farily sure they have blight.

As I understand it, blight is incurable but can be slowed down somewhat by using copper fungicide. So I removed any fruit/leaves that were infected and sprayed the plants with fungicide yesterday.

I am wondering as to what to do next. I am growing marmande tomatoes which is a beefsteak variety and only a few have ripened so far. I'd be expecting the majority to start ripening in another 1 or 2 weeks but should I pick these (particularly the larger ones) now and ripen indoors to avoid them getting infected?

Also, for fruit that are infected, are they a total write off or can they ripen and subsequently be eaten just cutting off the bad bits?

Any advice would be appreciated.
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michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
Posts: 1275
Location: cork

PostPosted: Thu Aug 12, 2010 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

potato blight on tomato leaves are exactly the same as on potatoes patches of grey mould underside and yellowing/browning on top. Symptoms on fruit hard black sunken areas but fruit remaining firm. Fruit van be eaten if affected portions are cut out.
Post a picture as it may be Didymella followed by Botrytis.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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DanyFish
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 11 Aug 2010
Posts: 3
Location: Dublin

PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for your reply. I attached a pictures showing an unripe tomato that I'd removed from the plants. I've also added a picture of one ripened fruit with the problem. I looked up the diseases you mentioned and they seemed to look more like a mould whereas this looks like they are rotting.

A few more fruit have developed the brown patches since I removed the others. Its all concentrated in one area but its spreading. Any thoughts on how I should proceed?



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michael brenock
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 12 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 13, 2010 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it is definitely potato blight and if you wish to prevent further losses then spray with a blight control spray of your choice when the next blight warning is given. There must have been potatoes growing near the tomatoes when the infection occurred. The rotting can come from secondary infection especially Botrytis in damp conditions but didymella fruit and stem rot can also cause damage under higher temperatures. Overwatering coupled with poor ventilation are contributory factors..
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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DanyFish
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 11 Aug 2010
Posts: 3
Location: Dublin

PostPosted: Sat Aug 14, 2010 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I sprayed it with a copper fungicide. This was the only thing I could find in my local Atlantic. There is a large garden centre nearby I could look in if there are more specific blight sprays. Based on what I've read, I think the fungicide has slowed it down somewhat but its hard to know.

I'm personally only growing tomatoes in my back garden so I don't know how it would have arrived in my garden. I live in Blanchardstown which is largely built up but I believe a lot of farming goes on in North Dublin so no doubt potatoes are grown somewhere not too far away.

Would you recommend I start picking larger tomatoes and ripen them indoors or just hope for the best and take my chances?
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