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Wind burn, Wind Damage, Leaf Desiccation and Your Plants.


 
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James Kilkelly, was GPI.
Rank: Site Admin


Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 1986
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 6:09 pm    Post subject: Wind burn, Wind Damage, Leaf Desiccation and Your Plants. Reply with quote

Wind burn, Wind Damage, Leaf Desiccation and Your Plants.
by GPI.

We have had to endure some heavy downpours of rain recently, this would lead you to presume that very few garden plantings would suffer from the lack of water, but the situation is not as "cut and dried" as it seems. During November, December, January and February, along with a fair amount of precipitation the Irish climate also throws a share of harsh and drying winds our way.
The drying ability of these winds can cause plants to draw upon large quantities of water. Water, that is required to replace the moisture that is lost through the plants wind dried leaves. A bitter drying wind causes leaf desiccation (drying) or windburn especially on the groups of plants that retain their leaves right throughout the winter; these two groups are the broadleaf evergreens and the conifers.

Broadleaf evergreens will retain a leaf covering all year round, prime examples being Laurel, Photinia, Mahonia and Choisya. Conifers also retain their scaly or needle-like leaf covering all year round with Leylandii, Yew, Pine and Cedar falling into this group. The often permanent browning of foliage in the path of harsh drying winds (burned Leylandii hedging anyone) can be lessened by the following two measures.

Photo / pic / image of wind burn, wind damage or leaf desiccation on leylandii and Hosta.

Arrow Firstly when locating these broadleaf evergreens and conifers, select a position which will afford them protection from drying winds, think about planting within a buffer of wind resistant planting such as Alder, Mountain Ash, Fuchsia etc.

Alternatively create an artificial wind buffer such as panel fencing, double trellising or the erection of the rather unattractive but effective wind break meshes which are widely available. To act as a windbreak for individual specimens, a simple screen of canvas sacking or clear polythene stretched between two posts is an economical option.

Arrow The other measure which will help combat water loss through leaves is simply to water your broadleaf evergreens and conifers, especially before periods of drying winds. A deep watering will offer a greater reserve of moisture to a plants desiccating leaves, this method is especially important with regard to new plantings as their water sourcing roots may be immature and require large reserves of the wet stuff.

Arrow One final tip, if you grow a conifer or broadleaf evergreen in a container, I would advise moving it to a sheltered location during the windy season. A prime example of this form of planting is the Bay Laurel tree, which is often clipped to a lollipop shape and proudly displayed by the doorsteps of many homes.

Any queries or comments on Wind burn, Wind Damage, Leaf Desiccation and Your Plants., please post below.

Further info... Frost in your garden, How to protect your plants.

The garden after a freeze, plants dealing with frost.

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easyram
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2011 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi!
Could you recommend any plant for a hedge for an open area with strong, frosty winds?
I have a young Escallonia hedge in my front garden (next to the driveway), it's only about 5 m long and can't be to high (max 1,5 m).

The last winter winds damaged the plants. I've cut it back quite strongly but it doesn't look good anymore. I would like to plant something in between the shrubs or in front (don't want to give up on the Escallonia...).
Are deciduous (sheds and renews leaves annually) shrubs the only good solution for frosty, drying winds?
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James Kilkelly, was GPI.
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Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 1986
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2011 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I suggest you look into a Wild / Mixed Hedgerow as this will cope with the frosty winds well, plus it will act as a buffer to prevent damage to your Escallonia.
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easyram
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2011 2:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you!
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2011 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the damage to your escallonia is caused by a foliar disease rather than from weather damage. Try Viburnum tinus, or Olearia macrodonta or Olearia traversii. Laurus nobilis, Cotoneaster lacteus or common Beech.
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easyram
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Location: Limerick, Castletroy

PostPosted: Sat Mar 19, 2011 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Please see the picture below.

The hedge is nearly one year old and after few heavy cuts.

I think it's better if I replace it with a different specie. The idea is to plant something in a form of more or less formal hedge in the first line and then add some lower shrubs like some Cotoneaster sp, Berberi sp, few perennials.
The grass doesn't look well too and the leaflet people cross the hedge every day and strew the bark. I would love to leave only a strap without shrubs/perennials and use clover or Sagina subulata or Thyme there instead of grass.

After Jame's suggestion I've chosen Ligustrum vulgare for the first line but I would cut it regulary anyway (lots of children around = shouldn't let it to bear any fruits, should I?).

And as I mentioned, it's a really windy spot.

Would that be a good idea?



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