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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Hard landscaping in Ireland, Garden Features (Paths, Patios, Paving, Decking, Walls etc)

Paving for back garden


 
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Tribesman29
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2010 8:46 am    Post subject: Paving for back garden Reply with quote

Hi,

Looking for some pointers for putting down some paving slabs in a back garden.
The size of the area to be covered is 326cmx390cm, not a huge size. It is surrounded by concrete path on two sides and a fence to the left and grass beyond. I just want to put down the larger type of square paving slabs.

There is grass of sorts on the area at the minute, and I am wondering roughly what the cost of getting someone in to do the job versus how hard the job would be to do myself would be.

Any help would be appreciated. I can provide photos if it makes it any easier to understand.

Cheers
Alan
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2010 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Photos would be a big help,its easier to suggest ideas when you see the project than trying to imagine it.
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Tribesman29
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2010 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I said not a huge job. Want to pave as far as where the end of the shed on the right is, where the last flower pot is.
Hopefully these help.
The drainage in the spot is not good as I think there is solid ground less than a shovel's length through the soil in places.

Again, any advice appreciated.



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View of the area I want to pave.
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View of the whole garden.
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Protein
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

just to clarify, you want to pave a portion of the garden? surely not the whole thing? edit - sorry- re-read your post, i know get ya Smile

If you are confidant at laying down slabs, and have some experience, I would attempt it myself. Or do you know some-one with some experience who can assist you as the area is quite small to get a contractor in?

Don't mean to add to your burden, but you'll also need to find a way to mask that unsightly oil tank

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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 30, 2010 9:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Tribesman29.From first glance you do have a bad drainage problem and unless you were familiar with installing drainage I would not attempt to DIY.but if you want a proper Job done there are several ways to keep your costs down without cutting Corners.1st get in a Builder or Handyman to give you a Quote for the work only (you supply Materials) and you be his Labourer,massive savings already.If there is a local Quarry source your drainage stones from them,and if you can remove the Top-Soil yourself thats another few Euro saved.
I know all of that is not any help to you but in the long run I think its the best option (no insult intended) but from the tone of your request I dont think you've ever encountered that problem before,Get a few Quotes. Sorry its not better News.
Regards. Dave.
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Tribesman29
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers for the help.

To be honest, it is not an essential job that I have to do ASAP. I am more concerned at the minute with sorting out the grass in the garden, as cost effectively as possible. Although it may not look too good now, compared to what it was when we moved in it has come a long way. Have just completed a 4-in-1 treatment hence the bare patches.

The drainage is a huge issue affecting the whole estate, but for the time being (a 7 week old baby in the house) it has to be put on the long finger.

As I now know that it is a fairly big job, albeit on a small area, I think I'll leave it until after Xmas and have it sorted for next summer.

Thanks again.
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sal
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the chair looks good there anyway,why spoil it
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Tribesman29
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah it does.....sun all day long...why ruin a good thing Laughing
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Sive
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 11:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Congratulations on the new baby !
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Sunny
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Tribesman29. I agree with Geranimojess, this would be your best option if you are looking to save costs. Also when you do decide to go ahead with the paving, consider paving over the concrete paths rather than in between them, giving you one pad, will look much better.
One other thing to take into consideration is, if you need to do drainage work, it allot easier to do in the summer while the weather is dry. Same with paving.

Good luck with it, be sure to post a pic with your progress.

Geranimojess wrote:
Hi Tribesman29.From first glance you do have a bad drainage problem and unless you were familiar with installing drainage I would not attempt to DIY.but if you want a proper Job done there are several ways to keep your costs down without cutting Corners.1st get in a Builder or Handyman to give you a Quote for the work only (you supply Materials) and you be his Labourer,massive savings already.If there is a local Quarry source your drainage stones from them,and if you can remove the Top-Soil yourself thats another few Euro saved.
I know all of that is not any help to you but in the long run I think its the best option (no insult intended) but from the tone of your request I dont think you've ever encountered that problem before,Get a few Quotes. Sorry its not better News.
Regards. Dave.

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Tribesman29
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yeah, I see where you are coming from re the concrete paths but I would rather keep them as they are as they go around to the side of house (semi-d) and it would not look right IMO with paving in the whole area and then a small bit of concrete path before you go around to the side.
As it is it is in good proportions, as all I am looking to do is put slabs on it, not smaller bricks.

Will update if anything happens.
Alan
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Geranimojess
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 1:33 pm    Post subject: RE Paving. Reply with quote

You've made the correct decision but dont be downhearted use this intervening time to get a few Quotes,check around your locality speak to Neighbours there are bound to be Handymen in the Area,by the time your ready to strip to the waist you will be more knowledgeable and confident.
Congratulations on your new arrival,wont be long before you will have a pair of helping Hands when you begin your Project.
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Tribesman29
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2010 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers

I have no problems doing the work to be honest - the main issue is cost and the fact that we are having a post christening party here in 6 weeks. Time constraints etc etc are more what is leading me to put it off.

Alan
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artalis
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 09, 2010 1:22 pm    Post subject: slab laying Reply with quote

Hi tribesman,

You will need to put down a proper foundation of hardcore first and it will need to be compressed using a watter otherwise your slabs will be uneven, wobbly and sink.

Watter's are usually available for hire at a cost of about 25euros a day, and a day's work should do it. But first have the area excavated, level and filled with hardcore and possibly a layer of sand over that, also to be watted. Then lay your slabs and watt them afterwards.

Some other suggestions for a damp/watery site>

Gravel or fine pebbles around the edge of your patio will help with drainage ( excavate an area of grass first before laying the gravel. This gravel area can be planted afterwards with low ground cover or moisture loving plants if the area is boggy.

Slope the patio slabs away from your house and towards a drain to assist with drainage run off.

Consider digging a trench around the edge of your plot and filling it with gravel and plastic pipe to help water run off. If there is an existing drain in your garden, you could terminate the trench next to the drain. It may also help to have the whole garden excavated and levelled again at an angle sloping slightly away from the house or else towards an existing drain.

Other things to consider are, what is your soil type? Is it a heavy clay prone to waterlogging? The soil structure can be improved in this case. Or else the existing garden soil can be replaced with a lighter free draining loam, that drains off more easily.Top soil is not too expensive, to buy by the ton.

Consider perhaps growing boggy, moisture loving plants in any soggy areas of your garden.

Get a willing friend with a strong back and pair of arms to help you out, it is very hard work after all. Celebrate with a garden party afterwards and a treat for any helpful friends.

Raised decking instead over the existing cemented area and adjoining grass?

Well...hope I haven't stressed you out with all of those suggestions, but the essential thing is to lay a proper foundation for slabs or else you may just end up with that sinking feeling.

Let us know what you decide Smile

artalis
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