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Suggestions for a feature tree in front garden


 
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SorchaBC
Rank attained: Hawthorn Tree
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Joined: 04 Mar 2010
Posts: 64
Location: West Cork

PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 10:18 am    Post subject: Suggestions for a feature tree in front garden Reply with quote

We have a big roundabout in the front garden, that at the moment has, well, it's hard to tell what's in it as it's so overgrown but I've made out cotoneaster, some sort of dwarf pine, brambles, lots of brambles, a self-seeded sycamore, and a cerise-pink rose. None of these have received any care or attention in decades, and we've decided that come the autumn it's all going.

In it's place there'll be a flowering tree, then roses, then lavender. The problem is that at the moment we can't see the trees for the wood so to speak. There are so many options, and since I'd be looking to put a relatively large tree in from the start it's important to get it right, as it'll be an expensive mistake to make otherwise! I was going for an apple tree, but since there'll already be a few in the garden himself has vetoed that plan. So I'm hoping that all you wise and wonderful folk can help Smile

We would like something that has flowers for a long enough period of time, has a nice enough shape without constant pruning (himself has a grá for weeping trees in particular) and would be in keeping with the cottage-style garden we're trying to create. Personally I'd like it to be useful as well, ie bearing fruit, but it's not a must. It'll have full sun, and although our soil is really awful, heavy clay we will be working on it before planting.

Oh, and anyone who'd like any of the plants that are being removed just let me know! There's nothing wrong with them, just that they're an unsightly mess the way they're arranged at the moment, and I'll be tempted to set them alight one of these days Twisted Evil

Jaysus, this has turned into an essay so I'll stop now, sorry Embarassed
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Sive
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Joined: 18 Apr 2008
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Location: Co.Wexford

PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 10:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd say you couldn't go wrong with a crab-apple....I know Malus John Downie is a highly recommended one. You'd have blossom and a crop too.....and then you'd have to make crab-apple jelly !
If you research the various crab-apples online, you're bound to find one that suits you.
Otherwise I'm a great fan of Amelanchier.... such stylish blossom....and not too heavy a foliage for a front garden. I'm familiar with Amelanchier Lamarckii and just adore it, in fact, having left one behind in my last house, I've just planted two. A super tree......
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kindredspirit
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Joined: 10 Nov 2008
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wedding cake tree.

Would be perfect in the middle of your roundabout.

You can buy a big one for €350.

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Protein
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Joined: 05 May 2009
Posts: 240
Location: Clare

PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2010 11:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about a Purple weeping Beech if he likes them? - no flowers but more seasonal interest in my books.

the other option is Crabapple (as mentioned) or Cherry blossom

me

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SorchaBC
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Joined: 04 Mar 2010
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Location: West Cork

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the feedback guys!

At the moment I'm leaning toward either the crab apple or perhaps a witch hazel (for the late autumn/winter interest).
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ormondsview
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
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Location: Kenmare, Co. Kerry

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:01 am    Post subject: feature tree Reply with quote

I agree with the weeping purple beech which grow tall and slender with all season interest, brown in winter, green in spring turning purple in summer. For a flowering tree, try the eastern redbud.

Monkey Puzzle tree is a specimen but slow growing.



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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 2142
Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2010 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll throw in my suggestion SorchaBC.
Prunus avium Plena...... the double white cherry.
Beautiful white pendulous double flowers in April/May. Pendulous should sort out the weeping husband. Wink
Reddish-brown to grey bark with green leaves turning wonderful shades of red in autumn/winter.
Related to on of our native cherries as well........ Native Wild Irish Cherry (Prunus avium)





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