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New lawn, need second advise!


 
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Ironleg
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 13 May 2010
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PostPosted: Sat May 22, 2010 6:25 pm    Post subject: New lawn, need second advise! Reply with quote

Hi everyone,
I started digging trenches in order to install the drainage pipes, to my surprise I discovered that my soil is only 15cm deep and under it just concrete with rock. Now I see why water wasn't going away from my lawn. And it's all over my 160sqm front lawn.
don't know what to do, I can't install the perforated pipes.
the only solution I can see is to put at least 5-7cm of stones and cover it with weed protecting cloth, so that water can escape thru the stone filled channel. And then just put the top soil in, so what do u experts think, will it work?
what's the min soil depth is required for the lawn?
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cooler
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Joined: 15 Jun 2006
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PostPosted: Sun May 23, 2010 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The ideal soil depth is 6 inches or 15 cms. 5cm of stones will leave you with 4 inches in which to grow grass. Possible but it will dry out extremely quickly in a dry spell of weather. Plus it will need close attention paid to fertilising as 4 inches does not hold onto feed as long as 6 inches. If you are prepared to feed regularly and water when needed then go for it.
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michael brenock
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Joined: 12 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2010 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you can get some top soil add it to the lawn and raise the soil level like a raised bed and this will help the grass to grow in better drained soil. failing that find the lowest point of the stones and concrete and try and establish a soak pit there by making a hole big enough to take the run off water. In shallow dry soils Fescues and bent grasses survive better than rye grasses.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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Ironleg
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
Rank attained: Hazel Tree


Joined: 13 May 2010
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PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2010 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

michael brenock wrote:
if you can get some top soil add it to the lawn and raise the soil level like a raised bed and this will help the grass to grow in better drained soil. failing that find the lowest point of the stones and concrete and try and establish a soak pit there by making a hole big enough to take the run off water. In shallow dry soils Fescues and bent grasses survive better than rye grasses.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)


Thanx a lot Michael
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