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Yellow leaves on plants, causes and cures.


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artalis
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
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Joined: 26 Jun 2010
Posts: 180
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 4:32 pm    Post subject: cordyline treatment Reply with quote

Hi Michael and James,


Found out that " Yates Rose Gun," and "Dithane 924." are suitable treatments for rust on Cordylines and that rust on these palm like trees is common enough. In cultivation they are routinely sprayed for fungus every few wks apparently. Now I know.

Thanks again guys,
artalis Very Happy

Now to source some if it ever stops raining.
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Rank attained: Sessile Oak Tree
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PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2012 8:21 pm    Post subject: Re: Yellow leaves on plants, causes and cures. Reply with quote

James Kilkelly, was GPI. wrote:
Yellow leaves on plants, causes and cures.


Iron deficiency on a Rhododendron showing up as yellow leaves, with leaf veins remaining green. , photo / picture / image.


"God you look pale, are you sick?" This concerned phrase is usually uttered human to human, if one of the individuals looks a tad off colour. However, where I am concerned, I will often offer the comment towards a particular shrub, perennial, or tree that has lost its green splendour.

Autumn colouration aside, when a plants normal green leaf colour begins to look drained, bleached, and yellowed, it's an indication that something is amiss. That something is usually a particular nutrient, without which the plant begins a struggle for survival.

With the recent heavy rain showers many plants have begun to exhibit yellowing of their leaves, as all that water from the sky washed precious nutrients down and away from their roots. The two main elements that you may find your garden plants lacking in are Nitrogen and Iron, so lets have a look at their symptoms, causes, and solutions, if they should be found wanting in your garden.

Nitrogen Deficiency
Deficiency symptoms: Pale green or yellow leaves.
Although more pronounced on older leaves, this shows up as a uniform yellowing of leaves including leaf veins. On occasion this is combined with the leaf petiole developing a reddish-purple colour, the petiole is the small stalk attaching the leaf blade to the plant stem.

Cause: Your soil has insufficient levels of the nutrient Nitrogen (N) to allow normal plant growth. This may be because your soil is too low in organic matter, and/or it drains much too quickly (sandy soil) leading to nutrients being washed away.

End result if left unresolved: Sickly looking spindly plants with decreased leaf and shoot growth. Such weakened plants are prone to attack from every bacteria, fungus, virus and pest going.

Solution: For an almost instant pick-me-up apply a nitrogen rich liquid feed to the root-zone and foliage of your affected plants. Follow this with an application of a slow release fertiliser to the base of the plant i.e. well-rotted farmyard manure (best), fish blood and bone, or pelleted poultry manure.

Iron Deficiency.
Deficiency symptoms: Pale green or yellow leaves, with leaf veins remaining conspicuously green, most obvious on younger leaves. The yellowing spreads over the whole leaf until it becomes almost completely bleached white.

Cause: Your plant requires the nutrient Iron (Fe), without it a chlorosis of the leaves begins. This deficiency may be because your soil is too low in organic matter, or if your organic matter levels are in fact adequate, it may be because your plant cannot extract the nutrient. You see Iron has low mobility in compacted and high pH soils (alkaline/limey).

End result if left unresolved: Leaf fall, shoot dieback, and unsatisfying flower and fruit production.

Solution: For a quick fix apply a liquid feed designed for use on acid-loving/lime-hating plants to the root-zone and foliage of your affected plants. Look for liquid feeds labelled Sequestrene or chelated iron. Another way to also decrease your ph, or make your soil more acid is by applying sulphate of iron to the soil around the plants at a rate of 100g per metre squared for each drop in ph point.


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Follow this with an application of well-rotted compost/farmyard manure to the base of the plant to up the fertility and acid levels. As well as compost/farmyard manure there are also many organic materials you can recycle by digging in around your plants and help acidify the soil. Used tea leaves/teabags, pine needles, and shredded/composted leaves are just a few handy ones that come to mind.

Of course you could discover that you have planted a total lime-hating plant into your lime-laden garden. If that's the case you may be fighting a loosing battle, so just accept defeat and opt to grow that particular plant in pot filled with ericaceous (acid) compost. To help you avoid planting lime-haters into alkaline soil here is a short list of those lime-hating plants.

Lime-hating Perennials.
Gentiana (Gentian)
Lithodora diffusa 'Heavenly Blue'
Celmisia (New Zealand daisy)
Dodecatheon (Shooting star)
Shortia (Oconee bells)
Meconopsis (Tibetan poppy)
Primula denticulate (Drumstick primula)

Lime-hating Shrubs.
Azalea
Calluna (Heather)
Daboecia (St. Dabeoc's heath)
Erica cinera (Bell heather)
Camellia (Japanese Camellia)
Clethra (Sweet pepper bush)
Desfontainia (Spiny desfontainia)
Enkianthus
Pieris
Rhododendron
Pernettya/Gaultheria
Magnolia
Kalmia (Mountain laurel)
Fothergilla (Mountain witch alder)
Leucothoe (Dog hobble)
Hamamelis (Witch hazel)

Lime-hating Trees
Eucryphia
Embothrium (Chilean fire tree)
Nothofagus (False beech)
Sassafras
Oxydendrum (Sorrel Tree)
Stewartia (deciduous (sheds and renews leaves annually) camellia)
Nyssa (Black tupelo)
Liquidambar (Sweet gum)

Lime-hating Fruit plants
Vaccinium (Blueberry/Cranberry)

Any queries or comments on Yellow leaves on plants, causes and cures, please post below.
My conifer has turned slightly yellow. I put http://www.lovethegarden.com/product-details/miracle-gro-azalea-camellia-rhododendron-soluble-plant-food on it. Should i put some ericaceous compost or sulphate of iron on the soil.

And should the tea bags be put on immediately after used or can they be left till I have a few to dig in? Where should I kep them
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just came across this now. Very likely to be Manganese deficiency probably caused indirectly by high pH (too much lime). Poor drainage could be a cause also. It is not Nitrogen deficiency.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

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PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2012 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How long would it take a tree to respond to sequestered Iron
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2012 9:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Iron deficiency on a tree is a very slow symptom to appear. There could be an underlying cause, like poor drainage. However the question which you asked as to how long it would take for the tree to respond to iron treatment the answer is a full growth year as the symptoms are irreversible in the leaves. The new leaves show normal colouring. Be aware also that the margin for error between deficiency and toxicity is quite small. Add a little sulphate of Iron in solution very dilute but do it often, remember the feeding roots are 10-12 inches deep.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2012 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael

is this a pic of iron deficiency in an amelanchier. Pic taken yesterday



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PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2012 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi banner This is hardly Iron deficiency, It is too highly coloured and looks to be an older leaf, whereas Iron deficiency is most prevalent on the younger emerging leaves. A bigger picture of the total bush would be better. I would not rule out the effects of a residual weedkiller in the vicinity even going back 3-4 years.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)

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