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Is the use of "Roundup" in allotments to be encour


 
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Is the use of "Roundup" in allotments to be encouraged?
Yes
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
No
40%
 40%  [ 2 ]
To each their own
60%
 60%  [ 3 ]
Total Votes : 5

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Gautama
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 29 Aug 2008
Posts: 156
Location: Cork

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 10:50 am    Post subject: Is the use of "Roundup" in allotments to be encour Reply with quote

Hi,
I was wondering how posters feel about the use of "Roundup" in allotments?

I received a group e-mail to my Allotment Association's mailing list yesterday advertising it:

Hi,
Just a note to say that I saw "Roundup" 540ml in Tesco Stillorgan yesterday for €13.99 where as Woodies & others are charging €25.99, for those of you who are interested, NO intention to upset anyone who is gardening organically, for info only.

Is this a bit odd?

I'm sure Monsanto and Tesco will be delighted, but is the use of poison to be encouraged where some people grow food, organically or otherwise.

Thanks,

G.
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medieval knievel
Rank attained: Chlorophyll for blood


Joined: 03 Sep 2007
Posts: 1008

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

there are some questions surrounding the use of roundup, as opposed to glyphosphate, which is the main - but not only - ingredient of roundup.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roundup#Human_and_mammalian_health_effects
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Sb
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree
Rank attained: Silver Birch Tree


Joined: 09 Jun 2006
Posts: 184
Location: east coast

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 11:14 am    Post subject: Re: Is the use of "Roundup" in allotments to be en Reply with quote

Gautama wrote:

I was wondering how posters feel about the use of "Roundup" in allotments?



Depends on if the allotments are strictly organic or not I reckon. Strictly organic then its a no no. Not strictly organic then if a plot has been left unattended for ages and a new plot holder is beginning then yes possibly. Rather than spraying a lot of plot holders will cover their plots with black plastic to keep them clean till next season. but then is black plastic even organic. Wink
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Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Having given MK's weblink quite a thorough going over, I can't see any real justification for using this product? Most of the reports have a slightly 'iffy' tone about them, even though they're actually sponsored by the maker, Monsanto, who've been prosecuted for dodgy activities in other spheres.

My veg patch was virgin field when I started three years ago but is now in reasonable order. I had prizewinning buttercups, docks and thistles amongst other things but it gets easier as you go along. If 'organic' is your religion, I can't see that plastic sheeting - which I've found very effective - can adversely affect the status of the ground beneath it and you have the added benefit that the green matter that dies off under it is recycled naturally by worms and slugs.

As with any poison, they can't be used selectively enough and the minute after you've applied them bees and other insects can pick up their elements before the plants/weeds die back. Natural insectivores like birds and hedgehogs then ingest the insects and the damage goes on up the food chain.

Finally, the old saying 'One year's seeds, seven years weeds' is also relevant. As far as I know, the poison doesn't kill off the seeds that are lying dormant in the ground and they'll come up the following year anyway.

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A novice gardener on newly cultivated, stoney ground.
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Blowin
Rank attained: Orchard owner


Joined: 20 Aug 2008
Posts: 678
Location: Drimoleague, Co Cork

PostPosted: Sat May 01, 2010 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As an add-on to my previous post, I walked past a field yesterday that was 'blitzed' last year. Yesterday it was a mass of yellow - dandelions, plantains and buttercups - which supports my opinion that seeds are impervious to the poison.
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