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cow manure


 
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earnies magic boots
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 4:06 pm    Post subject: cow manure Reply with quote

There is a beautiful walk near where I live and there are lots of cowpats. Some are fresh but many of them are now well rotted. I would like to know if they are still useful to add to my soil even if they appear dry and light in colour?? Does cow manure have a "best before date" if you know what I mean or is it always good when rotted?
If so I'll be down there next time with some bags, shovel and wheelbarrow.
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Foxylock
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's like striking gold, dung with straw is better but it would be no harm to add cowpats to your compost heap.
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earnies magic boots
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice one - I'm getting a polytunnel in two weeks so I will add it to the beds inside when it's up.......

Thanks.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

fresh cow manure has more nutrients than stale manure. The beneficial physical effects like extra humus remains the same. The nutrients are washed away by rain as time goes but not entirely. The addition of straw is beneficial and helps to store the nutrients for a longer period. Cow manure is a scarce commodity now.
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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Foxylock
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I added a few trailers of it to my beds this winter and the improvement in soil quality already has to be seen to be believed. I suppose I'm lucky enough to have a fresh and free supply all year round.
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Protein
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2010 10:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Can I clarify, so you can use fresh cow dung and it won't burn roots?

What about horse manure, I believe you have let that rot down or else it will burn the plants....

me

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Foxylock
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 04, 2010 9:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Horse manure should be let rot down for about a year. I was under the impression it was the same for cow dung and I added it to my beds in the winter allowing it to rot down before digging in.
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ormondsview
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 12:22 am    Post subject: cow manure and other kinds Reply with quote

For a rundown on what is "hot" and what is not in terms of burning your plants, see this site http://www.plantea.com/manure.htm. I have put straight cow manure that has been aged onto my rhodos and they slowed growing for 6mos turned yellow then took off after that. So I think that there is something to be said about the potency. Of course, there wasn't much soil to work into the mix, so it was just straight manure as top dressing. Above site explains the potency of various kinds of manure, namely chicken and horse are hot, not so cow. But good to know is that rabbit pellets are highest. I just took in a little grey rabbit to be kept as a pet. Apparently, the pellets work like ozmacote (slow release fertilizer.
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michael brenock
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cow manure is relatively safe to use fresh whereas poultry pig and stable manure are best allowed to rot for a few months before use. Never put roots in direct contact with any manure, allow the roots to go to the manure. Mixing the soil with the manure is always better than putting in a thick layer
michael brenock horticultural advisor (retired)
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earnies magic boots
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right so.....Gonna get me some cowpats then..

Thanks all.............
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Kiwi_Ed
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 11, 2010 4:00 pm    Post subject: Straight from the slurry pit Reply with quote

Hello all,

Living in the countryside (in the middle of a dairy farm actually) there is no shortage of cow manure. But most of it is in the slurry pit and I am not sure if I could just take a couple of buckets full of slurry from there and use it as manure for my vegetables. I was planning of digging it in after the season and then covering the garden with seaweed (also living near the sea, lucky me...).

Does anyone has any experience with this?

Thanks a lot,

Edwin
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