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Oxygenating plants?


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JennyS
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 10:23 am    Post subject: Oxygenating plants? Reply with quote

I've got serious problems with my pond and need some help and advice!

Its a large, semi-wild pond and when it was dug (in my ignorance at that point) I planted Canadian Pondweed and Parrots-feather as the oxygenators and Fringed Water-lily to give rapid surface cover Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed

Last year with the help of a leaf rake firmly attached to a 5 metre length of metal rod I managed to dredge them out but now I've a very unhealthy pond full of algae as there are no oxygenators left.......

Now that those oxygenators have been banned for sale because of the damage they can do if they get loose what can I plant instead and where can I get them from?

Confused Help please!

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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very unlikely you've got rid of all the parrot feather. I'd say, you'll find it growing back. It's a curse.

To clear your pond of algae, it would be best to put in a filter with UV bulbs. You need'nt turn on the bulbs in the winter but when the temperature warms up in the Spring and you turn them on, the UV light gets rid of all the green in the water.

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vulkan
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To expand on that.

A UV light does not get rid of the algae on its own, it causes the small green algae cells to clump together big enough for the filter to catch them.

Although you can turn your UV and filter off in the winter you should also change the UV lamp every spring since they only last for around 9 months because in order for a biological filter to work it must be on 24/7

A pump is also required to pump the water from the pond through the UV into the biological filter.

The size of the UV and filter and pump is dependant on the pond volume, it should turn the whole pond volume over once every four hours.
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JennyS
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The size of the UV and filter and pump is dependant on the pond volume, it should turn the whole pond volume over once every four hours.


Eek! Thanks for the suggestion but the pond is approximately 10 x 5 metres in size and over a metre deep...... I hate to think what the cost of turning that volume of water six times a day would be!

I want to replant with oxygenators if I can find suitable ones as its a semi-wild pond and I'd prefer not go the technology route (even if I could afford to).

An additional problem is that there is 10-15cms of liquid clay, silt and general decaying plant material at the bottom of it that needs removing first.
I've got in touch with a crowd that empty septic tanks, explained the problem and now I'm waiting for the guy to come and have a look, see if its possible to gloop out the silt etc and give me an idea of price.

Having searched the web there doesn't seem much in the way of environmentally friendly, deep water oxygenating plants around, or am I missing something?

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vulkan
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 9:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would not let the septic tank people near the pond.

They suck the muck from septic tanks, if you have a liner what is to say that wont get sucked up? (or at least damaged) a mesh on the end will stop the stuff being sucked up, and may still tear the liner. If it's a clay lined pond they may suck that up too.

To be honest if your pond (its really a lake) has that much silt in it, it should be pumped out and cleaned. I realise it will take quite some time, but if you don't you may end up with a bog not a lake.
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have a wildlife pond, 30 metres by 10 metres and I use a pump and filtering system with UV bulbs. Ultra violet light is natural, no chemicals and I think it is the way to go. The pond is awash with all manner of insects, frogs, newts and sticklebacks. We have the most ENORMOUS Great Diving Beetles!

You could try this site in Roscommon for oxgenating plants. http://irishwaterplants.com/oxygenatingPlants.html

Oxygenating plants are really plants that grow rapidly!

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JennyS
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 29, 2010 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
it should be pumped out and cleaned

Yes!
I first tried the neighbouring farmer to see if he could pump it out with his slurry pump but the ground is too soft for him to get close enough.

Next I tried a tool hire centre for pump hire but when I mentioned the amount of liquid clay, plant debris etc they reckoned none of their pumps would cope.

Then someone suggested the septic tank people might be worth a try as they would have very long pipes .........
Its basically a hole-dug-in-boggy-ground pond so there's no liner or puddled clay sides to get damaged.

Quote:
I have a wildlife pond, 30 metres by 10 metres and I use a pump and filtering system with UV bulbs.

If you don't mind me asking what did it cost to set up and what do you reckon your running costs are each year?

I checked the Roscommon site earlier but their main deep-water ones were the non-native Myrriophyllum again. I've found a UK site that have Hornwort, Ceratophyllum Demersum and Curled Pondweed, Potomageton crispus so they could be worth a try if they deliver to here.

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vulkan
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 5:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there anything else you would like to tell us or do we have to guess?

JennyS wrote:
I've got serious problems with my pond


Then you decided to tell us

JennyS wrote:
..... but the pond is approximately 10 x 5 metres in size and over a metre deep......


Then you decided to tell us that

JennyS wrote:
Its basically a hole-dug-in-boggy-ground pond so there's no liner or puddled clay sides to get damaged.


We can't help if you keep moving the goal posts
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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 6:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
If you don't mind me asking what did it cost to set up and what do you reckon your running costs are each year?


I don't know the initial cost as I bought a whole load of stuff together at that time and I did a deal for the total.

I have two biggish pumps which are 125 watts each and 2 Green Genie filters which have four 25 watt bulbs. When everything is on then, it's using 350 watts.

I personally don't think there's anything wrong with getting the septic tank people with a vacuum pump to empty the pond, even if it's used for emptying septic tanks as well. The ground is naturally heaving with bugs and viruses.

If you have an earthen pond without a constant fresh water inlet and outlet, then it's going to get green and mucky anyway, I think. The UV system solves all that. Alternatively just leave it for a year or two and see what nature does. There's a good chance then it'll reach a natural equilibrium and clear itself. That'll take TIME though.

You can also try rockworld.ie for pond vacuum cleaners. I've just bought an Oase Pondovac 4 from them for removing leaves at the bottom of our pond.

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JennyS
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 10:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the additional UV info Kindredspirit.

Quote:
Is there anything else you would like to tell us or do we have to guess?

Hi vulkan,
If you read my my first post you'll see I started this thread to try and discover what oxygenators I could plant to replace the (now banned) ones I cleared out which is relevant to any pond, regardless of its size, construction method etc.

However combination of photo and diagram of pond below as showing is easier than describing!



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kindredspirit
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That's a gorgeous pond.

I like the ferns as well.

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vulkan
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2010 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hi JennyS, a picture speaks a thousand words (Your diagram is also good)

I do not disagree that you initially asked for which plants to have, but as most good topics do, this one has turned a few corners from where it started.

I also now see you do have more to tell.

I now also find out its a stream fed pool.

As its stream fed that will be where most of your debris will be coming from, your pond will act just like an engine sump, collecting all the junk.

If it were mine I would sop the stream from feeding your pool as not only will it bring in all the debris, it will also bring in nutrients for all the plants you don't want, as well as any seeds too.

But it is a nice looking pond (lake)
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JennyS
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2010 12:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Strictly speaking no its not directly stream-fed.

The pond is fed by the spring and a 1 inch gravity-fed alcathene pipe coming from further upstream.
The connecting channel is only there as an outlet - pond water level is usually about 1/2 metre higher than the water level in the stream. (Marked on diagram)

The only time stream water directly enters is when it floods and then there are tall plants between the stream and pond that stop debris. The outlet channel is angled so even when in flood branches are not swept into the pond from the stream - I should have marked direction of flow which goes from left to right of image.

There is no problem with woody debris in the pond but the ground contains a high proportion of clay and when it was dug several years ago large broken chunks fell back in.
This has left the base with about 30cm of semi-liquid clayey silt which is what needs cleaning out. I had hoped it would settle and compact with time but it hasn't.

Back to the original purpose of the post .........
I gave up trying to source a retail outlet for less potentially harmful oxygenators here and found a really good UK site which stocks Potomageton crispus - Curled Pondweed, Myriophyllum Spicatum - Water Milfoil, Ceratophyllum Demersum - Hornwort and lots of other interesting water plants.

If anyone's interested: http://www.mimmacks.co.uk/index.asp

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ponddigger
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:22 am    Post subject: watertight barrier Reply with quote

beautiful natural pond jennys.question please how did you build the watertight barrier. yours ponddigger
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JennyS
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 05, 2010 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi ponddigger,
Hope the diagram below helps.
I dug a narrow outlet channel and sledge-hammered a big flat chunk of wood into the mud at base.
Edges packed with stones and earth until water-tight, not rocket science but it works!



pond barrier diagram.jpg
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