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Post new topic   Reply to topic    Irish Gardeners Forum Home -> Vegetable growing, fruit and allotments in Ireland

Planter Vegetable Growing advice needed


 
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jay
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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Joined: 16 Mar 2010
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:17 am    Post subject: Planter Vegetable Growing advice needed Reply with quote

Hi all,
Completely new to all of this and I was seeking some advice. I have already looked around the site and have found some very useful articles. it seems that the forum is awash with great knowledge and know how.

I am just starting off growing veg in polyurethene planters which I purchased in B&Q. I bought Levingtons Multi Purpose Compost with added John Innes and I was just wondering if this compost was suitable for growing veg in ?

Any other tips would be greatly appreciated as well.

Thanks


Last edited by jay on Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:47 am; edited 1 time in total
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Foxylock
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 9:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The size of the planter will determine what goes in but you will find most veg can be grown in planters also window boxes and growbags can be used if space is limited. The best advice is grow what you'll use and keep it simple to start with. Spring onions, shallots,lettuce and most herbs and also some fruit can be grown. Best of luck with it ..... and welcome. Smile
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cathd
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A band of cheap anti-perspirant around the rim of your planter (not where it will touch any leaves) will deter slugs and snails from helping them selves to your plants!
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jay
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2010 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the advice. I like the cheap anti persrpirant which sounds like a great cheap way of fighting slugs and snails.

At present I have transplanted some beetroot, spring onion, rocket, lettuce and radish seedlings into the planters. I still have cucumber, courgette, sweet pepper,tomatoes and peas to transplant.

What I am concerned about is overwatering. I am just not sure how much watering I should do. When I stick my finger into the compost it feels moist so should I not water until that has dryed up a bit or should I continue to water even when moist. Would a moisture meter be of any benefit to a newbie like me until I gain a bit more experience ?

Thanks again
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James Kilkelly
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Joined: 30 May 2006
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Location: West of Ireland

PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Three tips I can offer you for watering.

(1) Soak the soil completely, avoiding the light sprinkling approach.

Deep watering causes roots to drive deep into the compost making them much more able to deal with future droughts. A timid little sprinkling has the reverse effect, drawing roots to the surface only to be damaged by drying winds and sunlight.

(2) Water your container veg in the morning. By doing this your plants will be less inclined to fall prey to the fungal and other diseases which thrive after an evenings watering and the mild nights that follow.

(3) Pop your finger into the plants top layer of compost, and you find the first inch of the soil is beginning to dry out, you should water the plant thoroughly.
Instead of following a strict schedule of watering once a week, what you should be doing is continue checking the compost for moisture every 2nd day or so, and watering as and when required.
This method will prevent you over/under-watering the plants to the detriment of its health.

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jay
Rank attained: Hazel Tree
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the advice James. That really does help me as I was starting to get a bit frustrated.
I have already followed your advice and have watered just a couple of planters today instead of them all which is what I would have done.
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